Sounds Good

11 am - 1 pm Weekdays
  • Hosted by Tracy Ross, Austin Carter

About The Show

The music on Sounds Good is a mix of legacy artists who are still making great music now (Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson, Bruce Springsteen, Neil Young, Bonnie Raitt) deep cuts from classic artists (The Band, The Beatles, Grateful Dead, Talking Heads, REM) great contemporary artists who don' t receive commercial airplay (Neko Case, Wilco, Jack White, Darrell Scott, The Black Keys) and those who defy the boundaries of categorization (Punch Brothers, Bela Fleck, Ry Cooder, Bill Frisell, Justin Townes Earle). You'll also get a bit of World music, Blues, Soul/R&B, Reggae and Jazz.

Additionally, you'll hear interviews with newsmakers and community leaders, live music from some of our region's best musicians, our community events calendar and more.

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Prichard Committee, Facebook

Kentucky's Prichard committee for Academic Excellence, a nationally recognized education advocacy organization, sees a leadership change when Executive Director Dr. Stu Silberman's retirement is effective September 4th. This past April, the Prichard Board selected Brigitte Blom Ramsey to move into the directorship. This month, Prichard has highlighted its intentions to focus on post-secondary education and affordability. Last Monday, the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence was among educational organizations hosting a news briefing and discussion on college going in Kentucky. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte begins her conversation with Ramsey on this topic.

Cheryl Davis, 123rf Stock Photo

The Monarch population has rapidly declined in the last 10 years and naturalists are urging people to plant more milkweed and pesticide free nectar plants, which comprise a butterfly waystation. Former president of the Kentucky Garden Association Joanna Kirby calls the Monarch the 'canary in the coal mine' indicating a problem in the environment. She speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good about her monarch waystation efforts and the dedication of three in Paducah and Mayfield this weekend.

Glema Mahr Center for the Arts / Facebook

From across the pond comes some of Cambridge's best actors and actresses, here to help celebrate Glema Mahr Center for the Arts' 25th season with a performance of Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew. Center Director Brad Downall joins us on Sounds Good with more details on this performance and more free events.

paducahky.gov

Paducah Parks special event coordinator Molly Tomasallo speaks with Tracy Ross about tonight's Riverfront Concert with folk/rockabilly sounds by local band Solid Rock'It Boosters and Wisconsin rivertown group Horse Shoes and Hand Grenades. Tomasallo says there's toe tapping and surprises in this final free concert for the season from 6 to 8:30.

Cinema International

Murray State University's Cinema International kicks off this semester's lineup of films with Snowpiercer, an a science fiction film putting an alternative spin on the term "post-apocalyptic." The 2013 South Korean film depicts class warfare on a train of the sole survivors of the global ice age created by a failed attempt to stop global warming. On Sounds Good today, MSU Department of English and Philosophy faculty member Andrew Black previews the upcoming season of Cinema International, with a closer look at this week's film, Snowpiercer. 

Austin Peay State University Department of Art and Design Trahern Exhibition Schedule

Fifteen concrete figures of men, women and children augment a dark time in history through the powerfully crafted visual narrative of sculptor Stephen Hayes' Cash Crop, the first of this season's exhibits coming to Austin Peay University's Trahern Gallery.  Gallery Director Michael Dickens speaks with Kate on Sounds Good  about the lineup this season and the opening exhibit Cash Crop

Wickliffe Mounds State Historic Site / Facebook

Over 700 years ago, before the time of Daniel Boone and even Columbus, a community of ancient Native Americans thrived in a network of villages lining the Mississippi River. This weekend, children and adults alike can glimpse into that past at Wickliffe Mounds State Historic Site with a Mississippian Culture Gorget (pronounced 'gor-jet') Workshop. Park Manager Carla Hildebrand and Park Programmer Jessica Crisp speak with Kate on Sounds Good about the workshop and guided tour this Saturday.

Amazon.com

What do a mad scientist, a group of zany kids and monstrous frogs have in common? They're all in Murray State Alumnus Chris Schweizer's new graphic novel for kids, hitting brick-and-mortar and digital shelves this week. On Sounds Good, Chris talks about his experience as a graphic novelist and the inspiration behind his new book, The Creeps: Night of the Frankenfrogs

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Belly laughs and non-stop action are in store for audiences at the Playhouse in the Park production of "Noises Off" by Michael Frayn. The satirical farce about life in the theatre, which was once adapted into film featuring Carol Burnett, Michael Caine and many others, opens this weekend at the Murray community theatre. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with actress Vicki Morton about love triangles, underwear and sardines.

Murray State University 1961 Shield Yearbook, Courtesy of Wesley Bolin at Pogue Library

A group of six college students walked from Murray State University across the street to a small restaurant, about to quietly protest its “white-only” policy. Entering the establishment, the five white boys from New York ordered meals for the group. When the food was ready, Nancy Tyler Demartra, the first African American to attend MSU full-time and eventually graduate, stood up to pay. When the cashiers refused her money, the entire group said “no, thanks,” and walked out. It took about three months of visits like these, but with the help of others on campus the group finally pushed the restaurant to adopt an “open” serving policy. That was 1961. Fifty-four years later, Nancy speaks with Kate on Sounds Good about her experiences at MSU and her accomplishments in the Human and Civil Rights arenas.

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