Sounds Good

11 am - 1 pm Weekdays
  • Hosted by Tracy Ross, Austin Carter

About The Show

The music on Sounds Good is a mix of legacy artists who are still making great music now (Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson, Bruce Springsteen, Neil Young, Bonnie Raitt) deep cuts from classic artists (The Band, The Beatles, Grateful Dead, Talking Heads, REM) great contemporary artists who don' t receive commercial airplay (Neko Case, Wilco, Jack White, Darrell Scott, The Black Keys) and those who defy the boundaries of categorization (Punch Brothers, Bela Fleck, Ry Cooder, Bill Frisell, Justin Townes Earle). You'll also get a bit of World music, Blues, Soul/R&B, Reggae and Jazz.

Additionally, you'll hear interviews with newsmakers and community leaders, live music from some of our region's best musicians, our community events calendar and more.

twitter.com/wkms

The Living Room

These darlings of the Paducah music scene bring their unique sound to WKMS' Studio B for the next Sounds Good Live Lunch, Friday, August 12th at noon.  You can tune in live on your radio, stream us online, or watch a live video stream here!

J. Tyler Franklin/WFPL News

In videos of Fancy Farm, the annual political throwdown in southwestern Kentucky, you’ll usually see little white ceiling fans spinning furiously above the speakers, who are all shouting and sweating profusely with their sleeves rolled up.

jodylehigh, pixabay

You are Letcher County, Kentucky. You are rural, mountainous, and in the heart of the central Appalachian coalfields. Your economy is not in good shape. Fox News has called your largest town “the poster child for the war on coal.” You are offered funds to build a new federal prison. It could bring jobs but also brings up troubling moral issues. What do you do?

Brian Clardy via Facebook

Dr. Brian Clardy is a delegate from Calloway County at the DNC and a Murray State history professor. He speaks with Matt Markgraf about Clinton's speech and the message he will bring back to western Kentucky voters and how he might use his experience from the convention as a teaching tool in the classroom.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Tune in Friday (July 29), at Noon for our next Sounds Good Live Lunch featuring Nashville-based blues and rock band and WKMS Battle of the Bands finalist Year of October live in Studio B!

Matt Markgraf, WKMS, Courtesy of Pogue Library

NASA's Apollo 15 mission launched on this day 45 years ago. One of the goals of the mission was to conduct scientific experiments on the moon using the lunar roving vehicle, dubbed the "moon buggy." Western Kentucky native Johny B. Russell was one of the instrumental designers of this vehicle. On Sounds Good, Matt Markgraf speaks with Sarah Hopley, Special Collections & Exhibits Librarian for Pogue Library, about Murray State University's impressive collection of his work and achievements.

Courtesy of Brian Clardy, via Facebook

The Democratic National Convention is getting underway this week in Philadelphia, where Hillary Clinton is expected to formally accept the party nomination. Murray State history professor Dr. Brian Clardy is a delegate from Calloway County. Matt Markgraf checked in with Clardy this morning from the convention.

Courtesy of Bill Bartleman

The Republican National Convention in Cleveland has ended with Donald Trump formally accepting the GOP nomination for president. McCracken County Commissioner and retired Paducah Sun journalist Bill Bartleman was a delegate at the RNC. Matt Markgraf speaks with him about Trump's speech last night and the message he plans to bring back home to western Kentucky voters. 

Courtesy of Bill Bartleman

Thousands of people are in Cleveland, Ohio this week for the Republican National Convention as members of the party converge behind presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump. McCracken County 1st District Commissioner and former Paducah Sun journalist Bill Bartleman is a delegate and arrived at the RNC Sunday. Matt Markgraf speaks with Bartleman about his experience so far and what some of his goals are as a representative from western Kentucky.

Courtesy Grow Appalachia

Every few years, Appalachian food gets “rediscovered” by mainstream media outlets as an up-and-coming culinary trend. But does that interest actually benefit residents of the region as they navigate away from a coal-fueled economy?    Ashlie Stevens of member station WFPL looked at the pros – and cons – of the outside attention to Appalachia’s other natural resource. 

Pages