Sounds Good

11 am - 1 pm Weekdays
  • Hosted by Tracy Ross, Austin Carter

About The Show

The music on Sounds Good is a mix of legacy artists who are still making great music now (Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson, Bruce Springsteen, Neil Young, Bonnie Raitt) deep cuts from classic artists (The Band, The Beatles, Grateful Dead, Talking Heads, REM) great contemporary artists who don' t receive commercial airplay (Neko Case, Wilco, Jack White, Darrell Scott, The Black Keys) and those who defy the boundaries of categorization (Punch Brothers, Bela Fleck, Ry Cooder, Bill Frisell, Justin Townes Earle). You'll also get a bit of World music, Blues, Soul/R&B, Reggae and Jazz.

Additionally, you'll hear interviews with newsmakers and community leaders, live music from some of our region's best musicians, our community events calendar and more.

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jessedonaldson.com

Ebony Clark speaks with Author and Kentucky native Jesse Donaldson about his new book "On Homesickness," featuring passages about all 120 counties in the Commonwealth. Donaldson is on a book tour through the state. He was in the Pennyrile last week and is in the Jackson Purchase on Monday.

Mary Meehan | Ohio Valley ReSource

The Ohio Valley region has some of the country’s highest rates of smoking -- and smoking related disease. Kentucky has been called the country’s “cancer capital.” And teens smoke more in Kentucky and West Virginia than anywhere else in the America. But one teen from tobacco country who’s part of a new push to solve the region’s original addiction crisis.  

  MSU's Department of History will host its seventh annual ROOTS Music Concert at Lovett Auditorium, which will feature several award-winning musicians and Grand Old Opry veterans. Senior history lecturer, Dr. Ted Belue, visits Sounds Good to discuss details of the event.

Nicole Erwin, WKMS

  

The U.S. government's most comprehensive climate report to date says that the world continues to warm and humans are the cause. During Murray State University’s Agriculture Appreciation Week, the Sierra Club invited Murray native Dr. Adam Chambers to talk about climate change and agriculture.

 

Chambers is an air quality scientist for the USDA and co-founder of the Pinhead Climate Institute, a Smithsonian affiliate that works to educate young scientists about climate change in their communities. Nicole Erwin sat down with Dr. Chambers here at WKMS.  

Using Fear to Scare Away Mental Health Issues

Oct 30, 2017
Anthony/pexels.com

            New psychology research suggests the old cliche of 'facing your fears' might hold more truth than originally thought. MSU professor, Dr. Michael Bordieri, visited Sounds Good to discuss how fear might effectively scare away various mental health issues. 

Courtesy White House video.

Now that the president has officially declared the opioid crisis a health emergency, many people are wondering how that will help in the nation’s hardest hit region: the Ohio Valley. Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia collectively have an overdose death rate that is twice the national average. Aaron Payne of the Ohio Valley ReSource reports on some potentially helpful parts of the President’s plan and one big thing that’s missing. 

Sergey Kuzmin, 123rf stock photo

Governor Matt Bevin and state GOP leaders recently unveiled a proposal to overhaul the state's beleaguered pension systems. But what does it mean for teachers and other state workers? How will this plan affect people who aren't in the pension systems? Many agree something needs to be done about the state's pension crisis. So, if not this plan, then what could work as an alternative?

Louis Edward Nollau/Wikipedia

            Adolph Rupp, nicknamed "Baron of the Bluegrass," served as head basketball coach for the University of Kentucky for 41 years. MSU professor of history, Dr. Duane Bolin, visits Sounds Good to discuss his upcoming biography of Rupp, which details his successful -- and sometimes scandalous -- life. 

USDA/Bob Nichols

The poultry industry is asking the U.S. Department of Agriculture to allow faster work speeds at some facilities that slaughter and package chickens. The industry says a new inspection program allows them to process hundreds of birds per minute. But, worker and food safety advocates worry about higher speed in an industry with an already spotty safety record. 

Greg Gardea Photography/www.live2dye.com

          At 13 years old, Carol Larson stood at 6 feet and 6.5 inches. Due to surgically shortening her legs at an attempt at 'normalcy,' Larson faced challenges every day of her life, which she then translated into various art forms -- one of which has found a new home in Paducah's National Quilt Museum. 

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