Sounds Good

11 am - 1 pm Weekdays
  • Hosted by Tracy Ross, Austin Carter

About The Show

The music on Sounds Good is a mix of legacy artists who are still making great music now (Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson, Bruce Springsteen, Neil Young, Bonnie Raitt) deep cuts from classic artists (The Band, The Beatles, Grateful Dead, Talking Heads, REM) great contemporary artists who don' t receive commercial airplay (Neko Case, Wilco, Jack White, Darrell Scott, The Black Keys) and those who defy the boundaries of categorization (Punch Brothers, Bela Fleck, Ry Cooder, Bill Frisell, Justin Townes Earle). You'll also get a bit of World music, Blues, Soul/R&B, Reggae and Jazz.

Additionally, you'll hear interviews with newsmakers and community leaders, live music from some of our region's best musicians, our community events calendar and more.

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Courtesy CVI

When President Donald Trump signed his latest executive order last week, he surrounded himself with coal miners and returned to a familiar campaign theme: “job-killing” regulations. But in some corners of coal country, an environmental regulation is creating jobs. Stream restoration is part of a multi-billion dollar business, and some displaced miners are tapping into that revenue stream. Glynis Board of the Ohio Valley ReSource reports. 

Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

Man O' War is widely considered one of the greatest race horses of all time and turns 100 today. Man O' War won an incredible 20 of 21 races in 1919 and 1920 and sired multiple champion horses including Triple Crown winner War Admiral. The famous horse also has a distant connection to a Murray State alum who became a Hollywood actor and collector. On Sounds Good, Matt Markgraf speaks with Murray State Special Collections & Exhibits Librarian Sarah Hopley about Man O War's family ties to Hal Riddle.

Defunding Appalachia: Coal Communities Resist President’s Budget Cuts

Mar 27, 2017
Rebecca Kiger | Ohio Valley ReSource

President Donald Trump's proposal to cut the Appalachian Regional Commission and other agencies has alarmed some people in a region that helped to elect him. Now a budget resistance is brewing within the president's own party. Benny Becker of the Ohio Valley ReSource reports on what's at stake.

Todd Lappin, Flickr Commons (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Crime statistics show human trafficking is on the rise, including here in the Ohio Valley region. Now some former victims of trafficking are raising awareness, and they've teamed up with some unlikely allies. Nicole Erwin, of the Ohio Valley ReSource, reports.

Courtesy Rep. James Comer's Office

Republican Kentucky Congressman James Comer (1st Dist.) recently returned from a five-member congressional agricultural trade mission to Cuba. Comer said lifting the Cuban embargo on trade is a "no brainer" and plans on being a leader in Congressional efforts to do so. Matt Markgraf speaks with Comer about how the U.S. and Kentucky's first district could stand to gain from easing restrictions and expanding trade relations with the Caribbean island.

Rebecca Kiger

We’ve heard the statistics on the region’s heroin crisis, and how many have fallen into addiction. But one person’s story can tell a lot about what it takes to get out. As part of an occasional series on the Affordable Care Act, the Ohio Valley ReSource explores how the law expanded substance abuse treatment for thousands, including Wendy Crites. Producers Glynis Board and Rebecca Kiger bring us the story of Crites’ struggle for sobriety, told in her own words.

Rebecca Kiger

Addiction treatment specialists in the Ohio Valley are closely watching Washington’s health care debate. The Affordable Care Act helped expand treatment for substance abuse in Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia -- states with some of the nation’s highest addiction rates. As part of an occasional series, the Ohio Valley ReSource explores the potential effects of ending the ACA. Aaron Payne reports on what can happen when addiction treatment is lost.

Johnny Mac, via Facebook

Join WKMS for the next Sounds Good Live Lunch on Friday, March 3 at Noon, featuring John McDaniel, or Johnny Mac as he's widely known. Johnny Mac is a singer/songwriter/guitarist with two albums of original material to his credit. Watch the live stream on the WKMS Facebook page, made possibly by Murray State Live.

Casey Watson

Many volunteer for overseas humanitarian aid trips, traveling thousands of miles and raising thousands of dollars to help others. But what about volunteering at home? Casey Watson explores the dilemma of one nonprofit in Paducah. Starfish Orphan Ministry can find plenty of people willing to travel and to assist children in El Salvador and other countries. But, with the exception of special events, it struggles to find regular volunteers willing to help address the needs of people in its own city. 

Dr. Bob Davies, Murray State University

In a two-part conversation on Sounds Good, Matt Markgraf speaks with Murray State President Dr. Bob Davies, recapping some of the takeaways from the Board of Regents meeting last Friday. In the first part, they discuss the status of free speech on college and university campuses and Davies thoughts on free speech at Murray State. They also talk about the budget planning process for the next fiscal year and how the university is navigating a budget reduction of $4.5 million as it relates to enrollment and tuition. In the second part, they discuss the experiential learning EDGE Center, the Center for International Business and Trade in Paducah and why this year's Presidential Lecture has a focus on diversity in higher education. 

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