All Things Considered

Weekdays starting at 4pm

In-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features. 

 

Local Host(s): 
Chad Lampe
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f46ee1c88ef445b53438|5187f44ce1c88ef445b533ab

Pages

Law
3:43 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Supreme Court: At 21, Some Children Must Start Visa Process Over

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 5:42 pm

A fractured U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that when parents wait years to win legal entry into the United States, their children may have to go to the back of the line when they turn 21. The court's decision came on a 5-to-4 vote, with the majority split into two camps.

Under the Immigration Act, citizens and lawful permanent residents may sponsor family members petitions' for visas and green cards. In most cases, those immigrating with a minor child stand in line with their children. But even after approval, the process of getting a visa can take as long as decades.

Read more
Music News
3:16 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Apple Jacks The Headphone Port

What do you mean Apple is getting rid of the headphone jack? Where's it going?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 9:54 am

Apple may be set to end its use of the standard 3.5mm headphone connector — the mini plug — in favor of its proprietary connector, the Lightning port. If it was to do that, new iPhones, iPads and iPods wouldn't work with old headphones. It's had more than a few industry folks and Apple fanatics upset, to say the least.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:06 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

In Las Vegas Shootings, Some Suspect Roots In Anti-Government Militias

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 5:42 pm

A married couple apparently killed two police officers and another woman in Las Vegas. The husband and wife, also killed in the shooting, appear to have held anti-government and anti-law enforcement views.

Education
3:06 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

As College Tuition Soars, What Puts That Price Tag In Motion?

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 5:42 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

We wanted to figure out why college costs have been rising so much, and Anya Kamenetz with the NPR Ed team joins me now to break down the numbers.

Anya, why don't we take the example of a working-class student at a four-year public university getting no help from mom and dad? What do the numbers look like?

Read more
Sports
5:54 pm
Sun June 8, 2014

Baseball Has An Elbow Problem: More Pros Getting Ligament Surgery

After this pitch on May 27, Los Angeles Angels pitcher Sean Burnett left the game with a torn elbow ligament. Friday, he became the latest pro to undergo "Tommy John" surgery.
Elaine Thompson AP

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 2:13 pm

On Friday, Los Angeles Angels pitcher Sean Burnett became the latest player this season to undergo "Tommy John" surgery. In this weekend's MLB draft, at least four players selected had already had the infamous elbow surgery as amateurs.

The operation is named after the first player to undergo the procedure to fix an injured elbow ligament, in 1974. Pitchers are particularly vulnerable to this injury.

The procedure involves taking a tendon from somewhere else in the body — or from a cadaver — and grafting it into place. Pitchers get it most often.

Read more
Around the Nation
5:43 pm
Sun June 8, 2014

When A Parent Goes To Prison, A Child Also Pays A Price

Ifetayo Harvey's father went to prison when she was 4 years old and released when she was 12. Now 22, she says the experience helped her empathize with others and understand people from a different perspective.
Courtesy of Ifetayo Harvey

When she was a child, 22-year-old Ifetayo Harvey's father was sentenced to prison for cocaine trafficking.

"My dad went to prison when I was 4 years old, and he was released when I was 12," Harvey says.

Harvey is one of millions of young people who grew up with a parent in prison. A recent study from the National Academy of Sciences examined the growth of incarceration in the United States, and among the topics was the effect on kids and families when a parent goes to prison.

Read more
NPR Story
5:42 pm
Sun June 8, 2014

Scientist Touts Exoskeleton That Could Offer A Chance To Walk Again

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 12:20 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

This Thursday, the eyes of the world will be on Brazil during the World Cup's opening ceremony. And there'll be a remarkable moment during that event. From São Paulo, NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports.

Read more
U.S.
5:42 pm
Sun June 8, 2014

Was There Incentive At VA For Behavior That Created Scandal?

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath. It's time to fix the Department of Veterans Affairs. That's the consensus in Washington, where a bipartisan bill to do just that is expected to hit the floor this week. At least 18 veterans died while waiting for doctors appointments at a VA hospital in Arizona. While we still don't know if they died because of the wait, acting VA Secretary, Sloan Gibson, says the VA has failed America's veterans.

Read more
Business
6:03 pm
Sat June 7, 2014

'Downton Abbey' Craze Serves Up A Demand For Butlers

Jim Carter as Mr. Carson in Downton Abbey, which has helped fuel a growing demand for butlers around the world.
WGBH/PBS

Originally published on Sun June 8, 2014 4:05 pm

Butlers in American pop culture tend to provide comic relief — think The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air or The Birdcage. Or, like Batman's Alfred, the butler is more of a friend than an employee.

But one show has brought back the classic butler, with a vengeance. Since the British period drama Downton Abbey made its debut on PBS in 2010, the demand for butlers in some parts of the world has surged.

Read more
Religion
4:23 pm
Sat June 7, 2014

Lessons From The Language Boot Camp For Mormon Missionaries

Mormon missionaries pray before the start of their Mandarin Chinese class at the Missionary Training Center, in Provo, Utah.
Rick Bowmer AP

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 11:01 am

On a sunny Wednesday in Provo, Utah, a long line of cars spits out about 300 new arrivals to the Missionary Training Center. The facility, known as MTC, is the largest language training school for members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Every year, about 36,000 students come to the center before they leave on missions around the world to spread the Mormon faith.

Read more

Pages