Whitney Jones

News Reporter

Whitney grew up listening to Car Talk to and from her family’s beach vacation each year, but it wasn’t until a friend introduced her to This American Life that radio really grabbed her attention. She is a recent graduate from Union University in Jackson, Tenn., where she studied journalism. When she’s not at WKMS, you can find her working on her backyard compost pile and garden, getting lost on her bicycle or crocheting one massive blanket.

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Politics
3:21 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Mayfield Considers Smoking Ban

Credit www.wikipedia.com

The City of Mayfield could possibly ban smoking in public. This comes after a statewide ban failed in the Kentucky House.

Mayor Teresa Cantrell says there’s wide community support for a smoking ban. She says a public survey showed only 2 out of the 70 respondents were against a ban. Cantrell says a smoking ban wouldn’t just benefit a business’s patrons.

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Society
12:39 pm
Thu March 7, 2013

Empty Bowls Gives $20K to Community Kitchen

This year’s Empty Bowls Project came to an end this week with the charity’s coordinator handing a $20,000 check to Paducah’s Community Kitchen.

That amount is $1,200 less than last year even though the event’s coordinator Michael Terra says an additional 200 people showed. He says the contribution decrease was due to increased operating costs.

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Business
12:16 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Kentucky Ranked 10th Nationally for Industry Activity

An economic development magazine has ranked Kentucky 10th in the nation for new and expanded industry in 2012.

Site Selection magazine reports that Kentucky added 14,000 jobs and invested $2.7 billion in new industry activity last year. The state also generated 196 projects that involved at least a $1 million investment, created at least 50 jobs or added at least 20,000 square feet of new floor space. The top state was Texas, with 761 projects that met those terms.

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Education
11:29 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Kentucky Educators Can Voice Opinions in TELL Survey

Kentucky's primary and secondary educators can voice their opinions about their working conditions until March 29 in the state’s second Teaching, Empowering, Leading and Learning survey. The TELL survey gathers information from teachers, counselors, principals and administrators about school leadership, community support, professional development and other issues. The online survey is voluntary and confidential, but schools that have a response rate of 50 percent of higher will be entered into a drawing for $1,000.

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Crime
2:06 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Mother of Kidnapped Woman Files Lawsuit

A Madisonville woman whose daughter was kidnapped more than 17 years ago is suing the Kentucky State Police, Henderson Police Department, FBI and others involved in the unsolved case.

Sarah Teague 's suit alleges malfeasance in the case of her missing daughter Heather Teague  who disappeared in August 1995 from a Henderson County beach. In Teague's hand-written complaint she accuses law enforcement of not doing enough to solve her daughter's kidnapping.

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West Kentucky High Iron
9:43 am
Sun March 3, 2013

Looking for a Home on the Orphan Train

Credit The Cadiz Record

The Great Depression, along with floods and a severe drought in the 1930s, left many Kentucky families with the difficult decision to keep their hungry children or send them away to a place where they could be taken care of and fed. For at least one orphanage in Jefferson County, that meant overcrowding, and eventually the children’s home began sending orphans across the state on westbound trains.

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Morning Cram
9:07 am
Fri March 1, 2013

The Morning Cram [busy bee edition]

From NPR: Many fruit and nut farmers rely on honeybee hives to pollinate and continue growing their crop, but the honeybees just can’t do the work by themselves anymore. They need the help of other wild bees to get the job done. Those other bees, though, are disappearing, and it’s puzzling scientists.

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Politics
8:59 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Illinois Senate Approves Medicaid Expansion

Credit Wikimedia Commons

An expansion of Medicaid under President Barack Obama's health care overhaul is one step closer in Illinois. The state Senate passed the expansion 40 - 19 yesterday. The bill now goes to the House.

Nearly 2.8 million Illinois residents are currently covered by Medicaid, the government health program for the poor and disabled. And starting in 2014, an estimated 600,000 uninsured Illinois residents would be newly eligible for coverage. The expansion would mainly benefit low-income adults who don't have children at home.

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Society
8:55 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Sequestration Could Affect Ft. Campbell Employees

Credit Fort Campbell photo

Without a deal to stop sequestration, Fort Campbell’s garrison commander says the installation’s more than 8,000 civilian employees could face up to 22 unpaid days off this year. Col. David Dellinger says if all civilian employees go on that furlough, the cut would total $70 million. But he says that would take until the end of the fiscal year.

“No one will get furloughed without that individual getting a 30-day notice," he said. "As we look at this in timeliness, we’re looking at, you know, some 30-plus days before the first person will not show up to work or will be released an hour, two hours early, or however that is worked out with that individual.”

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Politics
8:20 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Industrial Hemp Supporters Ratchet Up Pressure

Credit Wikimedia Commons

Industrial hemp supporters are ratcheting up the pressure to force a vote on a stalled bill that would allow farmers in Kentucky to grow the crop if federal ban is lifted. A group led by state Agriculture Commissioner James Comer urged House Agriculture Committee Chairman Tom McKee Thursday to allow a vote on the bill. The group included a prominent northern Kentucky tobacco farmer who lives in McKee's district.

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