Stu Johnson (KPR)

Kentucky Public Radio Correspondent

Stu Johnson is a reporter/producer at WEKU in Lexington, Kentucky.

stu.johnson@eku.edu

JR ZERKOWSKI

Lexington Mayor Jim Gray says two Civil War-era Confederate statues are being moved in a respectful way to a final and appropriate resting place, the Lexington Cemetery.

LRC Public Information

A Republican leader in the Kentucky Senate still believes the General Assembly is on target to hold a late October or early November special session on pension reform.

Stu Johnson, WEKU News

A Harvard University economics professor says universities are responsible for seeking ways to benefit all citizens in their college towns. 

Paul Schneider, 123RF STOCK PHOTO

The Lexington-Fayette community placed 93rd and Louisville 97th in the 2017’s Greenest Cities in America report.

Steven Jones/123rf Stock Photo

An advocate of mental health awareness and treatment says diseases of the mind are often incremental in nature. A number of activities today focus on mental health awareness.

kykids.org

The Children’s Advocacy Center of the Bluegrass is extending its interviews of children suspected of being abused into southern Madison County. Services in the agency's Berea satellite location are expected to begin early next year.

123rf Stock Photo

Fayette Commonwealth’s Attorney Lou Anna Red Corn says if proposed state budget cuts are enacted, her office’s ability to assist police in fighting crime will be diminished.

Stu Johnson, WEKU News

The start of the 2017 fall meet at Keeneland also signals the beginning of a new social media service to offer pre-race betting advice.  Racing at the historic Lexington track begins Friday and runs through October 28th.   

Andriy Solovyov, 123RF STOCK PHOTO

The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety is sounding the alarm about new in-vehicle infotainment technology and its role in distracted driving collisions.  
A Kentucky State Police official anticipates more lock-out features in future vehicles.

Roger Rosentreter, 123rf Stock Photo

This week marks the start of Kentucky’s Forest Fire Hazard Season. A leading state forest fire official hopes this fall’s burnings are fewer and less severe than last year.

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