Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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The Two-Way
8:32 am
Mon April 15, 2013

FAA Orders Inspection Of Boeing 737s

An American Airlines 737-800 aircraft in January. The 737-800 is one of several variants the FAA has ordered to be inspected.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 11:45 am

Federal aviation officials have ordered that more than 1,000 Boeing 737s be examined to see if a key part on the plane's tail section needs to be replaced, The Wall Street Journal reported Monday.

The Federal Aviation Administration issued the airworthiness directive for a pin that holds the 737's horizontal stabilizer to the rest of the tail, to see if it is in danger of failing prematurely. The horizontal stabilizer — also known as the tail plane — enables the pilot to control the aircraft's pitch.

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The Two-Way
11:52 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Russia's Putin Announces $50 Billion In New Space Spending

A Soyuz capsule touches down in Kazakhstan in September, but by 2020, Russian cosmonauts might be splashing down instead.
Pool AFP/Getty Images

Moscow will spend $52 billion on its space program through 2020, including money for completion of a new launch facility on Russian soil.

The announcement came from President Vladimir Putin as he spoke to orbiting astronauts aboard the International Space Station on Cosmonaut's Day, the 52nd anniversary of the first manned space flight by Russian spacefarer Yuri Gagarin.

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The Two-Way
9:01 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Judge Rejects $20-Million Severance For American Airlines CEO

American Airlines CEO Tom Horton stands next to a control tower at Berlin Brandenburg Airport in March 2012.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 11:56 am

A severance package of $20 million might have seemed reasonable to American Airlines CEO Tom Horton, but a U.S. bankruptcy judge says it's too much.

The proposed payout, part of a deal that would merge American parent AMR and US Airways Group, first caught the attention of U.S. Trustee Tracy Hope Davis, a Department of Justice official monitoring AMR's Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

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The Two-Way
3:11 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Price Tag On Cyprus Bailout Goes Up

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 5:08 pm

It's going to cost more to bail out Cyprus than originally projected, with officials now saying the cost will be $30 billion instead of the original estimate of $23 billion.

"It's a fact the memorandum of November talked about 17.5 billion [euros] in financing needs. And it has emerged this figure has become 23 billion [euros]," government spokesman Christos Stylianides was quoted by the BBC as saying on Thursday.

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The Two-Way
1:50 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Mother Of George Zimmerman Accuses Media Of 'False Narrative'

George Zimmerman at a court hearing in Sanford, Fla., on Feb. 5.
Pool Getty Images

The mother of George Zimmerman, who was arrested a year ago in connection with the death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, has issued a letter proclaiming her son's innocence and decrying the media's "false narrative" about the fatal shooting.

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The Two-Way
11:05 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Ryan Says He's 'Cautiously Optimistic' On A Bipartisan Budget Deal

Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan speaks about his new budget plan after a March 19 party conference.
T.J. Kirkpatrick Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 9:55 am

House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan tells NPR that he's "cautiously optimistic" that a budget deal can be reached with the White House.

Speaking to NPR a day after President Obama unveiled a 2014 budget proposal that includes cuts to Social Security and Medicare, as well as tax increases and new investments in education and infrastructure, Ryan said he was encouraged by the broad outlines from the White House.

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The Two-Way
9:51 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Tepid Reception To Windows 8 Blamed For Drop In PC Sales

Visitors tried out Windows 8 last month at the 2013 CeBIT technology trade fair in Hanover, Germany.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 3:21 pm

Sales of new PCs plummeted nearly 14 percent globally in the first three months of the year, and much of the blame is being placed on Microsoft's new Windows 8 operating system.

International Data Corp. reported Wednesday that shipments of PCs totaled 76.3 million worldwide in the first quarter of 2013, down 13.9 percent from the same period the previous year.

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The Two-Way
8:51 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Japanese Car Makers Recall Millions Of Vehicles Over Faulty Airbags

The 2002 Toyota Corolla. At least some of them are subject to recall.
Jeff Kowalsky AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 12:14 pm

Some 3.4 million vehicles produced by four Japanese automakers are being voluntarily recalled due to faulty airbag inflators.

The inflators were installed in some of Toyota's top-selling Camry and Corolla models produced since 2000. Certain Honda Civics and Mazdas are also subject to recall, which also reportedly includes the Maxima and Cube, according to Reuters.

The defective passenger-side airbag inflators were produced by Tokyo-based Takata at a Mexican plant, Reuters says.

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The Two-Way
2:42 pm
Wed April 10, 2013

Dealer Says He Doctored Most Valuable Baseball Card Ever Sold

A rare example of the 1909 Honus Wagner baseball card. In 2007, one of them fetched a whopping $2.8 million.
Chris Hondros Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 10, 2013 4:17 pm

A judge has rejected a plea agreement from the former head of a sports memorabilia auction house who admitted to using shill bidders to drive up prices and to altering the most valuable baseball card ever sold.

William Mastro of Mastro Auctions admitted to doctoring the 1909 Honus Wagner cigarette card that was once owned by hockey great Wayne Gretzky. The card sold for $2.8 million in 2007.

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The Two-Way
1:02 pm
Wed April 10, 2013

Test-Tube Baby Pioneer Dies

Dr. Robert Edwards holds the world's first "test-tube baby," Louise Brown, on July 25, 1978. A midwife stands in the center, with gynecologist Patrick Steptoe on the right.
Keystone Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 10, 2013 1:27 pm

The man whose research led to the world's first test-tube baby more than three decades ago, has died at age 87.

Robert Edwards, who later won the Nobel Prize, began experimenting with in vitro fertilization, or IVF, in the late 1960s. His work, controversial at the time, eventually led to the birth of the world's first "test tube baby," Louise Brown, on July 25, 1978.

Since then, IVF has resulted in about 5 million babies worldwide, according to the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology.

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