Sam Sanders

Sam has worked at Vermont Public Radio since October 1978 in various capacities – almost always involving audio engineering. He excels at sound engingeering for live performances.

Sam has been an audio engineer for most of his professional life. From 1965 to 1978 he was the Supervising Audio Technician at the New York Public Library Record Archives at Lincoln Center.

He enjoys camping, hiking, canoeing, and contra dancing; and he loves to travel, especially to Peru and the Caribbean. Sam has served for many years as a volunteer in response to the AIDS epidemic.

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(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "CASABLANCA")

HUMPHREY BOGART: (As Rick Blaine) Here's looking at you, kid.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "GONE WITH THE WIND")

CLARK GABLE: (As Rhett Butler) Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "ON THE WATERFRONT")

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LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

There was a time when a whistleblower had to rely on the Postal Service, or a pay phone, or an underground parking garage to leak to the press.

This is a different time.

A renewed interest in leaks since Donald Trump's surprise election victory last fall, and a growth in the use of end-to-end encryption technology, have led news organizations across the country to highlight the multiple high-tech ways you can now send them anonymous tips.

For some time, the public has known that Donald Trump does a lot of his tweeting himself, from the account @realDonaldTrump, and from an Android smartphone. But many cybersecurity experts believed that would change once Trump took the oath of office, because White House-approved communication devices are much more secured — and stripped down — than the smartphones the rest of us use.

Since winning this year's presidential election, Donald Trump has given the American public no shortage of outbursts, public disputes and grandiose declarations on Twitter.

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We're more than a week past the moment when Trump became the president-elect, and the news is still bringing people out into the streets. NPR's Sam Sanders has been asking protesters what drives them.

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