Ryland Barton

Kentucky Public Radio State Capitol Reporter

Ryland is the state capitol reporter for Kentucky Public Radio. He's covered politics and state government for NPR member stations KWBU in Waco and KUT in Austin. Always looking to put a face to big issues, Ryland's reporting has taken him to drought-weary towns in West Texas and relocated communities in rural China. He's covered breaking news like the 2014 shooting at Fort Hood Army Base and the aftermath of the fertilizer plant explosion in West, Texas. 

Ryland has a bachelor's degree from the University of Chicago and a master's degree in journalism from the University of Texas. He grew up in Lexington.

Ryland Barton

After Republican leaders of the state Senate scrapped a critical vote to change retirement benefits for public workers last week, it’s unclear when or if the legislation will come back up for a vote.

Nicole Erwin, WKMS

In the wake of the January shooting at Marshall County High School, Kentucky lawmakers have advanced a bill that would require schools to employ mental health professionals to recognize symptoms of trauma in students.

J. Tyler Franklin / KyCIR

The widow of a state lawmaker who killed himself late last year will not run in this year’s primary or general elections to fill her husband’s vacant seat.

Ryland Barton

This week in Kentucky politics, the state senate decided to not vote on a controversial pension bill as teachers and other state workers protested at the state capitol. It’s unclear how the legislation might be revised and lawmakers only have a little more than two weeks until a major deadline in this year’s legislative session.

Ryland Barton, Kentucky Public Radio

  After teachers and other public workers descended on the state Capitol Friday to protest a bill overhauling Kentucky’s pension systems, the state Senate decided to not take a vote on the measure.

Acdixon, Wikimedia Commons (CC0)

  As federal corruption investigations swirl in college basketball, Kentucky lawmakers are considering a measure that would tighten regulations that apply to sports agents.

rido, 123rf Stock Photo

Local officials would be able to boost the salaries of teachers in struggling public schools in order to make the positions more attractive to job applicants, under a bill that passed a state Senate committee on Thursday.

J. Tyler Franklin/WFPL News

Gov. Matt Bevin says teachers are wrongfully attacking him for pushing to overhaul the state’s ailing pension systems, saying they’re either “ill-informed or willfully blind.”

J. Tyler Franklin via WFPL

Gov. Matt Bevin was non-committal when asked what he thinks of President Donald Trump’s proposal to institute tariffs on foreign-made steel and aluminum.

LRC Public Information

The leader of the state Senate is making no promises on whether proposals to increase the cigarette tax and create a tax on pain pills will be considered in his chamber.

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