Rhonda Miller

Rhonda Miller began as reporter and host for All Things Considered on WKU Public Radio in 2015.  She has worked as Gulf Coast reporter for Mississippi Public Broadcasting, where she won Associated Press, Edward R. Murrow and Green Eyeshade awards for stories on dead sea turtles, health and legal issues arising from the 2010 BP oil spill and homeless veterans.
 
She has worked at Rhode Island Public Radio,  as an intern at WVTF Public Radio in Roanoke, Virginia, and at the South Florida Sun-Sentinel and Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.
 
Rhonda’s freelance work called Writing Into Sound includes stories for Voice of America, WSHU Public Radio in Fairfield, Conn., NPR and AARP Prime Time Radio.
 
She has a master’s degree in media studies from Rhode Island College and a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Boston University.
 
Rhonda enjoys quiet water kayaking, riding her bicycle and folk music. She was a volunteer DJ for Root-N-Branch at WUMD community radio in Dartmouth, Mass.
 

Rhonda Miller, WKYU

The Bowling Green-based International Center of Kentucky is not requesting any refugees from Syria for the next fiscal year. The center’s Executive Director Albert Mbanfu said Syrian refugees are not expected to be approved because the Trump administration considers them a "special concern."

Kentucky Association of Food Banks

The Kentucky Farms to Food Banks program is adding a new source of protein to help families in need get balanced nutrition. 

International Bluegrass Music Center

An Evansville construction company is getting a second chance on a showcase project for Kentucky’s signature music. Danco Construction has been awarded the contract for the International Bluegrass Music Center.

Credit Flickr/Creative Commons/ Gertrude K

  Purple flowers that look like they could be a cover crop in many fields in Kentucky and Indiana are more than flowering weeds.   An agriculture extension agent says those purple blooms are a sign of climate change the increasingly unpredictable weather that farmers have to deal with.

Rhonda Miller, WKYU

A handful of southern Kentucky activists rallied at the Bowling Green office of U.S. Senator Rand Paul in support of a national campaign to urge the Senate Foreign Relations Committee to establish an independent investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Rand Paul is a member of that committee.

via March for Science Bowling Green, KY, Facebook

Bowling Green organizers are planning a local March for Science in support of the national event on April 22, which is Earth Day.

Owensboro Public Schools

 Owensboro Public Schools would be hit with a cut of $1 million  a year if the proposed federal budget is approved.

Nick Brake, Superintendent of Owensboro Public Schools, was in Washington, D.C. during this past week meeting with the region’s Congressional delegation. He said he urged legislators to maintain critical funding for education.

ALAN WARREN, via WKYU

The International Bluegrass Music Museum in Owensboro has received an extensive collection of bluegrass CDs, LPs, cassette tapes, books and recorded radio shows.

Alexander Korzh, 123RF Stock Photo

The new report by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office predicts that 24 million Americans would be without health insurance in the next 10 years if the current Republican proposal to replace the Affordable Care Act is approved. 

visitohiocountyky.com

A groundbreaking has been set for the Bill Monroe Museum in west Kentucky. 

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