Philip Reeves

Philip Reeves is an award-winning veteran international correspondent based in Islamabad, Pakistan. Previous to his current role, he covered Europe out of NPR's bureau in London.

Reeves has spent two decades working as a journalist overseas, reporting from a wide range of places including the former Soviet Union, the Middle East and Asia.

A member of the NPR team that won highly prestigious Alfred I. duPont–Columbia University and George Foster Peabody awards for coverage of the conflict in Iraq, Reeves has been honored several times by the South Asian Journalists Association.

In 2010, Reeves moved to London from New Delhi after a stint of more than seven years working in and around South Asia. He traveled widely in India, taking listeners on voyages along the Ganges River and the ancient Grand Trunk Road. He also made numerous trips to cover unrest and political turmoil in Pakistan.

Reeves joined NPR in 2004, after spending 17 years as a correspondent for the British daily newspaper, The Independent. During the early stages of his career, he worked for BBC radio and television after training on the Bath Chronicle newspaper in western Britain.

Over the years, Reeves has covered a wide range of stories - from the Waco siege, to the growth of the Internet, Boris Yeltsin's erratic presidency, the economic rise of India, and conflicts in Gaza and the West Bank, Chechnya, Iraq, Afghanistan and Sri Lanka.

Graduating from Cambridge University, Reeves earned a degree in English literature. He and his wife have one daughter. His family originates from New Zealand.

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Asia
4:02 am
Thu June 11, 2015

Pakistan Executes Man Who Was 15 When Charged With Murder

Relatives of convicted murderer Aftab Bahadur mourn beside his body after his execution in Lahore, Pakistan, on Wednesday. Bahadur was just 15 when he was accused of a 1992 murder. Pakistan has executed more than 150 people since lifting a moratorium on the death penalty last December.
Arif Ali AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 11, 2015 2:36 pm

Shortly before he was put to death, Aftab Bahadur wrote an essay. He spoke of his alienation and loneliness, of the comfort he found in art and poetry, and of the anguish of awaiting execution on death row in Pakistan.

"I doubt there is anything more dreadful than being told that you are going to die, and then sitting in a prison cell just waiting for that moment," he said, according to a text translated from Urdu and released by Reprieve, a human rights group based in Britain.

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Asia
3:44 pm
Wed June 10, 2015

Pakistani Journalists Divided Over Whether Government Perks Cloud Their Autonomy

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 5:46 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Middle East
6:51 am
Sun April 26, 2015

Pakistani Activists Mourn Slain Human Rights Proponent

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 6:42 am

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Asia
4:20 pm
Sun April 19, 2015

Chinese President To Discuss Massive Trade Route During Pakistan Visit

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 5:36 pm

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Middle East
4:07 am
Fri April 10, 2015

Pakistan's Dilemma: Should It Assist Saudi Arabia In Yemen Operation?

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 6:56 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Afghanistan
4:18 pm
Sun February 22, 2015

New Defense Secretary Makes Unannounced Trip To Afghanistan

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 6:21 pm

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World
3:36 pm
Fri January 16, 2015

One Month After School Attack, Pakistan Remembers Victims

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 5:32 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

In Pakistan, one month ago today, the Taliban attacked an army-run school in the city of Peshawar - 150 people were killed, the vast majority of them children.

(SOUNDBITE OF DEMONSTRATION)

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Asia
5:29 am
Fri November 28, 2014

In Pakistan, Political Oratory Is Flourishing

Originally published on Fri November 28, 2014 6:16 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
11:48 am
Sat November 1, 2014

A Taliban Hostage's Story: Educating Children Who Have No Teachers

Professor Ajmal Khan was held captive in South Waziristan, the Pakistani tribal area bordering Afghanistan where the Taliban holds power.
B.K. Bangash AP

Originally published on Mon November 3, 2014 12:02 pm

A compelling Facebook photo shows an old man wearing spectacles and a shawl. He's standing in front of a cracked mud wall. Most of his face is filled by a huge, dusty-looking white beard. He looks tired and sad.

Only the man's family and friends would know that he is not, in fact, a weather-beaten mountain tribesman, but the vice chancellor of one of the most distinguished universities in Pakistan.

This picture of professor Ajmal Khan, posted on the Web by his supporters, was printed by a newspaper when he was freed, after spending four years as a hostage of the Taliban.

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Asia
4:21 am
Fri October 10, 2014

Pakistani Teen Shares Nobel Peace Prize

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 7:05 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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