Nina Totenberg

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The U.S. Supreme Court, forging its way to the end of the current term, unloaded a raft of important decisions Monday, with many more expected in the days to come. At the same time, the court agreed to hear a case next term that will test whether there is a constitutional limit to how much partisanship can be used to draw legislative maps.

Among Monday's decisions were these:

In the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, hundreds of mostly Muslim immigrants were rounded up and held in harsh conditions in New York. They later sued, but on Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that high-ranking Justice Department officials from the George W. Bush administration were immune from those lawsuits.

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By day, Don McGahn is a straight-laced lawyer, but by night, he's a long-haired rocker.

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As a hurry-up execution schedule plays out in Arkansas this week, the U.S. Supreme Court and Arkansas Supreme Court have stepped in to block two of the eight executions initially scheduled for an 11-day period.

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