Nicole Erwin

Multimedia Journalist (for Ohio Valley ReSource, WKMS)

Nicole Erwin is a Murray native and started working at WKMS during her time at Murray State University as a Psychology undergraduate student. Nicole left her job as a PTL dispatcher to join the newsroom after she was hired by former News Director Bryan Bartlett. Since, Nicole has completed a Masters in Sustainable Development from Monash University in Melbourne, Australia where she lived for 2 1/2 years.

Nicole also worked in South Korea as a journalist where she anchored the local English TV news, hosted a national radio show and freelanced with the Jeju Weekly. She is an avid traveler with more than 25 countries under her belt and finds beauty in the environment and the stories within it.

Nicole Erwin / WKMS

A new 20,000-student study from Harvard University finds that children are increasingly learning to value personal success above all else. According to the Making Caring Common Project, the results of that mindset can contribute to a growing population of young people that lack empathy. Despite some challenges, local efforts have taken root to help teach both understanding and basic kindness.

National Low Income Housing Coalition / http://nlihc.org/sites/default/files/oor/OOR_2015_FULL.pdf

  It’s been a year since the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development mandated a flat rate increase for public housing. Some local housing officials thought it would price people out of the homes as HUD set rates based off of fair market value prices. 

Cheryl Davis, 123rf Stock Photo

The Monarch population has rapidly declined in the last 10 years and naturalists are urging people to plant more milkweed and pesticide free nectar plants, which comprise a butterfly waystation. Former president of the Kentucky Garden Association Joanna Kirby calls the Monarch the 'canary in the coal mine' indicating a problem in the environment. She speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good about her monarch waystation efforts and the dedication of three in Paducah and Mayfield this weekend.

Captain-tucker, Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 3.0

There are two main Butterfly emergence periods throughout the year, June and September. While the butterfly population will appear plentiful during this time, there is one species you won’t see as frequently as you would have ten years ago, the Monarch.

Steve Reed/Courier Journal / http://kyhealthnews.blogspot.com/2013_05_01_archive.html

  Almost overnight the Affordable Care Act created a pool of 400,000 Kentuckians eligible for Medicaid-supported dental services. However, the website Dental IQ has ranked the Commonwealth 47th in oral care.  That’s partially because incentives are low for dentists to take on these new patients.

WKMS News

  Rural free health clinics are seeing a drop in clients as the Medicaid rolls grow in Kentucky thanks to expanded coverage. But, some people  are falling into a gap where opting out of health insurance and paying a penalty is the most affordable option.  

Jimmywayne / http://www.photoree.com/photos/permalink/3433507-61278305@N00

  Political junkies in Kentucky believe history will be made this weekend at the Fancy Farm Picnic, as the stage will host what is believed to be the first black female candidate. Jenean Hampton is the Republican candidate for Lt. Governor. And just as the stage party has lacked diversity over the years, so has the audience.  

Bill Buchanan, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, fws.gov

One of nature’s tiniest birds will be featured at the Tennessee Springville, Tennessee Wildlife Refuge Center next month.  Visitor Services Manager, Joan Stevens, at The Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge said, “Who doesn’t love seeing a tiny hummingbird up-close, it’s pretty awesome.”

WKMS News

Murray’s main thoroughfare, 12th street, appears to be receiving a facelift with some demolition and construction of new businesses.  Many of them are banks.  

University of Kentucky, College of Agriculture

  University of Kentucky Officials are looking to spend $16-million  to expand a Caldwell County research center to become the Kentucky Grains Center of Excellence.

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