Nicole Erwin

Multimedia Journalist (for Ohio Valley ReSource, WKMS)

Nicole Erwin is a Murray native and started working at WKMS during her time at Murray State University as a Psychology undergraduate student. Nicole left her job as a PTL dispatcher to join the newsroom after she was hired by former News Director Bryan Bartlett. Since, Nicole has completed a Masters in Sustainable Development from Monash University in Melbourne, Australia where she lived for 2 1/2 years.

Nicole also worked in South Korea as a journalist where she anchored the local English TV news, hosted a national radio show and freelanced with the Jeju Weekly. She is an avid traveler with more than 25 countries under her belt and finds beauty in the environment and the stories within it.

Nicole Erwin

Last year, more than a thousand Ohio Valley farmers used a complicated federal visa program to hire some 8,000 foreign workers for seasonal jobs. Farmers say the visa program is too bureaucratic, and a bill before Congress promises to cut red tape. But labor advocates say the bill would strip guest workers of many protections in an industry where wage theft is already a problem.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Paducah City Manager Jeff Pederson is stepping down after Mayor Brandi Harless asked for his resignation.

Nicole Erwin, WKMS

  

The U.S. government's most comprehensive climate report to date says that the world continues to warm and humans are the cause. During Murray State University’s Agriculture Appreciation Week, the Sierra Club invited Murray native Dr. Adam Chambers to talk about climate change and agriculture.

 

Chambers is an air quality scientist for the USDA and co-founder of the Pinhead Climate Institute, a Smithsonian affiliate that works to educate young scientists about climate change in their communities. Nicole Erwin sat down with Dr. Chambers here at WKMS.  

Michael Durham, Bat Conservation International

  Bats have a bit of an image problem. You probably saw some Halloween decorations this week featuring flying, fanged creatures of the night. But conservationists say bats are actually very helpful animals, saving farmers in the Ohio Valley region alone hundreds of millions of dollars simply by eating harmful insects.

  Now bats need some humans to return the favor and help to halt the spread of a deadly disease.

Via Facebook

  A collision on Highway 453 in Lyon County has claimed the lives of a Murray State University student and a recent local high school graduate. The Kentucky State police report a single vehicle collision on The Trace occurred last night.

Chris Elwell, 123rf Stock Photo

The number of dairy cows in the Commonwealth continues to decline.

USDA/Bob Nichols

The poultry industry is asking the U.S. Department of Agriculture to allow faster work speeds at some facilities that slaughter and package chickens. The industry says a new inspection program allows them to process hundreds of birds per minute. But, worker and food safety advocates worry about higher speed in an industry with an already spotty safety record. 

Nicole Erwin, Ohio Valley ReSource

  The Environmental Protection Agency has agreed to some limits on the use of a controversial herbicide called dicamba, which farmers throughout the region have blamed for crop damage. A change to the label on the chemical will restrict sales of dicamba to certified users. 


Courtesy of Keith Taylor

  A California company hopes to develop a $30M  hemp processing plant in western Kentucky.

Kings Royal Biotech of San Diego, California along with an unnamed Chinese partner plan to begin the processing of more than a thousand acres of hemp in Carlisle and Hickman Counties, with the 2018 Hemp harvest.

Dr. Bob Davies, Murray State University

Murray State University will see a $4.5 million dollar increase in pension obligations if state legislators can’t come up with a plan in a special session expected this fall. That’s according to President Bob Davies in a letter to faculty and staff today on Monday.

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