Lisa Gillespie (KPR)

WFPL Reporter

Lisa Gillespie is WFPL's Health and Innovation Reporter. Most recently, she was a reporter for Kaiser Health News. During her career, Gillespie has covered all things health — from Medicaid and Medicare payment policy and rural hospital closures to science funding and the dietary supplement market.

BELCHONOCK, 123RF STOCK PHOTO

  In 2010, Kentucky pulled funding for family drug courts, including Louisville’s. This court was for parents who had social services take their children away because of neglect or abuse as a result of addiction.

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A renewed effort to get people to quit smoking in Kentucky is launching Wednesday in Frankfort. Led by the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky and Baptist Health, at the top of the coalition’s to-do list is to raise the cigarette tax to $1.60 a pack. That’s a $1 increase over the current rate.

Medicare.gov via Twitter

In April 2018, Medicare officials will begin sending out new health insurance cards that no longer include enrollees’ social security numbers.

WFPL

  Association health plans that sell limited-coverage health insurance are back, under an executive order signed by President Donald Trump Thursday. Trump — as well as Kentucky’s two U.S. senators — touted the order as one that will allow Americans to access more affordable health care policies, but critics say the executive order could create more problems in the U.S. health care system.

Lisa Gillespie, WFPL

  Kentucky has some of the worst health outcomes in the nation, and that’s especially true around Appalachia. A report from the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky in August found the rate that infants die shortly after birth is higher there – even compared with Lexington and Louisville.

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Kentucky regulators say they’ll go to court to keep from handing over documents related to the state’s plan to reconfigure its Medicaid insurance program. But legal experts say Kentucky’s argument — that it doesn’t have to turn over emails and other communications because they are preliminary and about negotiations — doesn’t hold up.

Courtesy Josh and Brooke Maupin

  Josh Maupin was excited for driver’s ed class.

The 27-year-old was born with fetal alcohol syndrome, a developmental disability that means he has to take more time to learn and process concepts. He gets distracted easily.

Lisa Gillespie, WFPL

If the latest attempt to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act is successful next week, more than 400,000 people in Kentucky who have health insurance through the Medicaid expansion would lose their coverage.

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A recent news report said the federal government has OK'd most of the Medicaid changes Governor Matt Bevin proposed a year ago. All but the work requirement, which is still being negotiated.

The new Kentucky Medicaid program — if approved — would include a de facto work requirement for the first time in the program’s 50-year history.

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Workers injured on the job received fewer prescription opioids after landmark legislation passed in Kentucky that set up a drug monitoring database, according to a new study out Tuesday.

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