Lisa Autry (KPR)

Kentucky Public Radio Correspondent

Lisa is a Scottsville native and WKU alum.  She has worked in radio as a news reporter and anchor for 18 years.  Prior to joining WKU Public Radio, she most recently worked at WHAS in Louisville and WLAC in Nashville.  She has received numerous awards from the Associated Press, including Best Reporter in Kentucky.  Many of her stories have been heard on NPR. 

Official Photo/

A close friend and neighbor of Rand Paul says the attack on the U.S. senator apparently had something to do with property.

Rand Paul official photo, Rene Boucher mugshot via Warren County Regional Jail

Some new information is coming to light as to why a retired physician assaulted U.S. Senator Rand Paul at his Bowling Green home over the weekend. 

law_keven/Creative Commons

Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles says Kentucky farmers continue to gain more access to major grocery chains. 

Lisa Autry, WKYU

U.S. Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky is downplaying the indictment of President Trump’s former campaign manager. Paul Manafort and an aide are the first to be criminally charged in the investigation into possible Russian influence in U.S. politics. 

Christian County Detention Center

 A new poll suggests that a man charged in the brutal death of a young Scottsville girl can’t get a fair trial in Allen or adjacent counties. 


For some Kentuckians, Walmart is now offering a game changer when it comes to grocery shopping. 

The Fairness Campaign, via WKYU

The largest city in Kentucky without a fairness ordinance will host its first pride festival later this month. 

Sergey Kuzmin/123rf Stock Photo

Thousands of public employees and teachers in Kentucky are waiting with nervous anticipation to find out what changes Kentucky lawmakers will make to their retirement plans. The pension systems face massive shortfalls and have been rated among the worst in the country. 

J. Tyler Franklin/WFPL News

U.S. Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky appears to have notched a victory in the health care debate in Washington. 


Kentucky’s education leaders say they are encouraged by some of the results from statewide assessments during the 2016-17 school year.