Lisa Autry (KPR)

Kentucky Public Radio Correspondent

Lisa is a Scottsville native and WKU alum.  She has worked in radio as a news reporter and anchor for 18 years.  Prior to joining WKU Public Radio, she most recently worked at WHAS in Louisville and WLAC in Nashville.  She has received numerous awards from the Associated Press, including Best Reporter in Kentucky.  Many of her stories have been heard on NPR. 

J. Stephen Conn / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

Casey County, Ky remains one of the latest few holdouts among counties not issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples.  

County Clerk Casey Davis says the Supreme Court ruling legalizing gay marriage nationwide is against his beliefs and maintains he won’t compromise his convictions.  

Brookings Institution / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

With a Supreme Court decision expected any day now, Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear says state agencies are making preparations should the justices vote to allow gay marriage.

Graco Children's Products, Flickr (Creative Commons License)

A new child safety seat law takes effect Wednesday in Kentucky.

The law requires children younger than 8 and between 40-57 inches tall to ride in a booster seat.

Office of KY Secretary of State

County clerks across Kentucky will be double checking vote totals tomorrow\today in a statewide recanvass requested by two Republicans.  

Gubernatorial candidate James Comer is seeking a recanvass after losing to Matt Bevin by 83 votes in last Tuesday’s primary.  Richard Heath lost to Ryan Quarles by just over 14-hundred votes in the race for the GOP nomination for Agriculture Commissioner.  While Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes plans to announce the outcomes of the recanvass tomorrow\today, she says the winners will still be unofficial until next month.

American Red Cross Blood Donors, Facebook

The American Red Cross is sending out an appeal for blood donations.  

With someone in the U.S. needing blood every two seconds, it’s always challenging to collect enough blood to meet the needs of patients, but Spokeswoman Regina Conway with the Tennessee Valley Region says blood donations typically decline during the summer months.

Jonathunder, Wikimedia Commons

A court date has been set for a judge to hear arguments in a right-to-work lawsuit against Hardin County.

Oral arguments will take place in U.S. District Court in Louisville on August 4th. 

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One in ten registered voters is expected to cast ballots Tuesday in Kentucky’s primary election.  

Voters on May 19th will choose their nominees for governor and other constitutional officers.  

Based on previous elections and the 5,100 absentee ballots cast, Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes predicts 10% of registered voters will go to the polls.  

Medi-Share (

Nationwide, a majority of emergency room physicians report an increase in the number of patients since the Affordable Care Act took effect.

iStock Photo

Some Henderson County teachers will not be returning to the classroom next school year. 

Faced with a $6.7 million shortfall, the school system is cutting positions.  Layoff notices are going out this week to teachers at every school. 

School system spokeswoman Julie Wisher says about 80 positions are being cut. 

An Amish father and son will be in a Logan County courtroom Wednesday.  The men are facing charges of violating a local ordinance requiring owners to clean up after their large animals.

Amos Mast and his son Dan, both of Auburn, were cited this year by police for refusing to fit their horses with special bags to collect their droppings.  The ordinance requires large animals to wear the collection devices in order to keep streets clear of feces. 

Members of the Amish community object to the law, claiming the devices can spook their horses.  The Mast family will take their case before a jury in Logan District Court. 

The Masts are members of the Old Order Amish, the same sect involved in a legal battle a few years ago when they refused to place a slow-moving vehicle emblem on the back of their horse-drawn buggies.  They objected to the bright orange emblem on religious grounds.  The General Assembly eventually passed a law allowing the Amish to place reflective tape on their buggies.