Lisa Autry (KPR)

Kentucky Public Radio Correspondent

Lisa is a Scottsville native and WKU alum.  She has worked in radio as a news reporter and anchor for 18 years.  Prior to joining WKU Public Radio, she most recently worked at WHAS in Louisville and WLAC in Nashville.  She has received numerous awards from the Associated Press, including Best Reporter in Kentucky.  Many of her stories have been heard on NPR. 

ICE logo, via Twitter

Fifty-three undocumented foreign nationals living in Kentucky were recently arrested by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. 

Sergey Kuzmin/123rf Stock Photo

As President Trump’s administration ramps up immigration enforcement across the nation, a new report finds that illegal immigrants in Kentucky 'contribute significantly' to the state and local economies. 

Lisa Autry, WKYU

Supporters of a 'fairness ordinance' will lobby the Bowling Green City Commission Tuesday evening. 

Nadezhda Prokudina, 123rf Stock Photo

The Kentucky House and Senate have given final approval to a couple of bills aimed at helping the eight-thousand children in the state’s foster care system. 

Alexey Stiop/123rf Stock Photo

Although the Kentucky General Assembly met for only five days in January, lobbyist spending broke a record for the first month of an odd-year session. 

Ryland Barton, WFPL

study released this week by the University of Louisville finds that 40 percent of homeless youth in Louisville and southern Indiana have been victims of sex trafficking. 

leekris, 123rf Stock Photo

A Bowling Green immigration attorney says many undocumented immigrants in the region are asking if they’ll be impacted by President Trump’s recent executive orders.

Lisa Autry, WKYU

Some Kentucky businesses are placing their names on a growing national list of sanctuary restaurants. 

At least ten businesses in the commonwealth have declared themselves sanctuary restaurants, meaning they have zero tolerance racism, sexism, and xenophobia.  The designation also bans harassment against anyone based on their immigrant or refugee status. 

WKMS File Photo

An employee of a western Kentucky mine has been indicted by a federal grand jury for falsifying safety records and lying to inspectors. 

David Osborne, via WKYU

Twenty-eight years ago, as a Daviess County sheriff’s deputy, David Osbourne went to the home of Darrell Perry to serve an eviction notice.  Perry had never been on the radar of local police, so Osbourne thought serving him with papers would be routine business.

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