Lisa Autry (KPR)

Kentucky Public Radio Correspondent

Lisa is a Scottsville native and WKU alum.  She has worked in radio as a news reporter and anchor for 18 years.  Prior to joining WKU Public Radio, she most recently worked at WHAS in Louisville and WLAC in Nashville.  She has received numerous awards from the Associated Press, including Best Reporter in Kentucky.  Many of her stories have been heard on NPR. 

Lisa Autry, WKYU

Kentuckians wanting to fly on a plane, enter federal buildings, or visit military posts will need a new driver’s license or identification card in the near future. 

WKMS news

U.S. Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky says he’s working with President Trump to offer relief to millions of Americans needing affordable health insurance coverage.  

Lisa Autry, WKYU

As the U.S. Senate this week voted to hold debate over repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act, former Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear accused some Republican politicians of “religious hypocrisy.”

Frettie, Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 3.0)

Kentucky has become the first state in the nation to mandate the use of face protection for high school softball players. 

Lisa Autry, WKU Public Radio

A total solar eclipse will cross North America next month for the first time in nearly a century.  And Hopkinsville, Kentucky will be ground zero as day turns to night.  The rural town nestled in western Kentucky will offer the longest opportunity to view the eclipse in the entire world.

iStockPhoto

Some Kentucky and southern Indiana physicians have been charged in what U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions calls the largest health care fraud takedown in the nation’s history. 

BELCHONOCK, 123RF STOCK PHOTO

  A Kentucky attorney has cleared a major hurdle in his bid to join a federal appeals

court.  John Bush’s nomination was approved Thursday by the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Lisa Autry, WKU Public Radio

Veterans advocates say the hard part has just begun as Bowling Green seeks to open the state’s fifth veterans nursing home. 

Natalia Merzlyakova, 123rf Stock Photo

  A new report out from the left-leaning Commonwealth Fund finds more than 32,000 jobs could be lost in Kentucky by 2026 if the U.S. Senate passes its proposal to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. Most of those jobs would be in healthcare, but the report found other fields, like real estate, could also be hit.

Author: Ludovic Bertron, via Wikimedia Commons

 Several Kentucky communities are holding events this weekend in solidarity with  the National Equality March in Washington, D.C.  In fact, the Kentucky Fairness Campaign says a record number of pride events are scheduled this summer and  fall in the bluegrass state.  

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