Lisa Autry (KPR)

Kentucky Public Radio Correspondent

Lisa is a Scottsville native and WKU alum.  She has worked in radio as a news reporter and anchor for 18 years.  Prior to joining WKU Public Radio, she most recently worked at WHAS in Louisville and WLAC in Nashville.  She has received numerous awards from the Associated Press, including Best Reporter in Kentucky.  Many of her stories have been heard on NPR. 

FLICKR/CREATIVE COMMONS/ERIN PETTIGREW

Workers with Kentucky’s largest employer are being told to dress a little more appropriately. 

A new dress code for executive branch workers that went into effect this month bans flip flops, midriff shirts, large commercial logos, and offensive language.  

Andy Beshear, Matt Bevin, official photos

Kentucky’s Attorney General is accusing Governor Matt Bevin of “dragging his feet” on returning millions of dollars to the state’s colleges and universities. 

http://www.campbell.army.mil/

Fort Campbell is hosting a job fair this week for service members who are retiring from active duty.  About 450 soldiers leave the military post each month. 

official portrait, tn.gov

Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam has had a change of heart regarding Syrian refugees. He says he no longer opposes their resettlement in the volunteer state. 

Andriy Popov, 123rf Stock Photo

Kentucky educators will be trained this week on how to administer a heroin antidote. The drug Naloxone, also known by the brand name Narcan, is being made available to high schools who voluntarily choose to participate. 

composite: (Johnson) Gage Skidmore; (Stein) JTuruc / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

Kentuckians dissatisfied with the major party candidates for president have two other options.  

Lisa Autry

On a peaceful hillside in Hardin County stands Kentucky's September 11th memorial.

It was first unveiled on the tenth Anniversary of the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington. With some additions, the memorial is now complete for the fifteenth anniversary this weekend.

WKU

An African-American student at Western Kentucky University says a recent act of vandalism has made her become more aware of her surroundings. 

Cheyenne Mitchell’s car was keyed with a racial slur this week while parked on campus.

Marek Szucs, 123rf Stock Photo

  Kentuckians are paying more for their groceries for the first time in more than a year according to the Kentucky Farm Bureau’s quarterly Market-Basket Survey.

iStockPhoto

Kentucky is being recognized for having one of the highest graduation rates in the country among low-income students. The commonwealth has been named a national leader in closing what's known as the achievement gap.

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