Lisa Autry (KPR)

Kentucky Public Radio Correspondent

Lisa is a Scottsville native and WKU alum.  She has worked in radio as a news reporter and anchor for 18 years.  Prior to joining WKU Public Radio, she most recently worked at WHAS in Louisville and WLAC in Nashville.  She has received numerous awards from the Associated Press, including Best Reporter in Kentucky.  Many of her stories have been heard on NPR. 

Natalia Merzlyakova, 123rf Stock Photo

Kentucky’s congressional members are tipping their hand as to how they will vote Thursday on the Republican plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. 

Kentucky Department of Education

The Unbridled Learning accountability system for Kentucky’s public schools is on the way out.  For the past year, education leaders have been crafting a new model to measure student proficiency. 

via WKYU

  The head of the Warren County-based Kentucky International Center says President Trump’s revised travel ban doesn’t bring him much optimism. 

ICE logo, via Twitter

Fifty-three undocumented foreign nationals living in Kentucky were recently arrested by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. 

Sergey Kuzmin/123rf Stock Photo

As President Trump’s administration ramps up immigration enforcement across the nation, a new report finds that illegal immigrants in Kentucky 'contribute significantly' to the state and local economies. 

Lisa Autry, WKYU

Supporters of a 'fairness ordinance' will lobby the Bowling Green City Commission Tuesday evening. 

Nadezhda Prokudina, 123rf Stock Photo

The Kentucky House and Senate have given final approval to a couple of bills aimed at helping the eight-thousand children in the state’s foster care system. 

Alexey Stiop/123rf Stock Photo

Although the Kentucky General Assembly met for only five days in January, lobbyist spending broke a record for the first month of an odd-year session. 

Ryland Barton, WFPL

study released this week by the University of Louisville finds that 40 percent of homeless youth in Louisville and southern Indiana have been victims of sex trafficking. 

leekris, 123rf Stock Photo

A Bowling Green immigration attorney says many undocumented immigrants in the region are asking if they’ll be impacted by President Trump’s recent executive orders.

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