Kate Lochte

Station Manager

Kate Lochte was born in Texas, and grew up in Alabama, Alaska, New York, and Maine. She and Music City, Tennessee native Bob Lochte have sojourned in Los Angeles, Nashville, Knoxville, Chattanooga, Pulaski, and Greeneville, Tennessee and now, Murray, Kentucky. Kate has taught high school and college English; office-managed the Hunter Museum of Art in Chattanooga; written for the Chattanooga Free Press and the Pulaski Citizen newspapers; broadcast news and music for WMGL-FM and WKMS-FM; and broadcast for WETO-TV as the Kid's Klub's "Granny Goose." The Lochtes and their dogs enjoy being at home in the woods of Calloway County. For a time, Kate shared her appreciation for world music hosting shows Ports of Call and Country Music on WKMS.

Ways To Connect


Panic attacks are relatively common. About one in five Americans will experience a panic attack in their lifetime, says Dr. Michael Bordieri, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Murray State University. It's the sudden onset of fear, similar to the fight or flight response, where our heartbeat starts racing, our palms feel sweaty, our breathing is faster, we may feel uneasy and tense, like we're losing control or having a heart attack. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with Dr. Borideri on identifying panic attacks and panic disorder and how to receive treatment.

Bill Ford, Courtesy of Ray Lane

Doing business as Bill Ford Interiors, Inc. in Paducah, Bill Ford is involved in many of the city's cultural activities and has begun a new project called From Paducah With Love. The art book collects original pen and ink drawings by Ford with articles from the community about reflections and memories of the city. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte asks him more about the project, the gallery reception and how his signature bowties make an appearance.

Jenn King

Murray Neurologist Dr. Christopher King of Primary Care Medical Center was surprised at the large turnout at a community education meeting about memory loss back in May. He finds that the anxiety about memory loss and dementia leads to a feeling of isolation. He believes that early detection is important and there are resources that exist to help. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with Dr. King about his concerns.

LeCows Dairy, Facebook

LeCows Dairy in Paducah is the last dairy farm in McCracken County. Passed down over generations, the family farm is now a women-owned business, with co-ownership between Ellie Gore Waggoner and her mother Lesa Elliott Clark. Ellie will be among the farmers in the Q&A session after the screening of the documentary "Farmland" at Maiden Alley Cinema on Friday, July 31, hosted by The Kentucky Soybean Board and CommonGround of Kentucky. The latter is an organization of Kentucky women offering conversations between women who grow food and women who buy it. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with Waggoner about her experience in farming and the upcoming film.

Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain

The public is being invited to comment about moving the statue of Jefferson Davis from the State Capitol Rotunda in Frankfort to a nearby history center. The Kentucky Commission on Human Rights is encouraging the public to attend a meeting of the Kentucky Historic Properties Advisory Commission on August 5, and to comment on the removal by July 29th. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with Commissioner Timothy Thomas of Madisonville.


As Mayfield's Icehouse Gallery celebrates 25 years as a community beacon of the arts, the gallery honors local artists in current and upcoming exhibits.  Gallery Director Ric Watson speaks with Kate on Sounds Good today to share more about exhibits and events going on this month and next at the Icehouse. 

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Murray State University Assistant Professor of History Dr. Zackery Heern says modern Shi'ism started with the "modernity" in general - around the 1700s, roughly the same time as the Enlightenment in Europe, birth of the United States and French Revolution. He's published a book titled The Emergence of Modern Shi'ism: Islamic Reform in Iraq and Iran. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with Dr. Heern about his research and gains some context and clarity into the historical differences between Shi'ism and Sunnism.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Henry Wildy Harding Sr. was among the first settlers to Calloway County after Kentucky's first governor Isaac Shelby and Andrew Jackson negotiated the Jackson Purchase with the Chickasaw. Back then, this land was mostly untouched wilderness. Homes, barns and fences had to be built by felling trees. Harding settled on approximately 1,000 acres of what is now the northwestern part of Murray and Calloway County. Between two wives (his first died before moving to western Kentucky), he fathered 18 children, five of whom fought for the Confederate Army in the Civil War.

Later in his life, he oversaw the local school district, donating a portion of his land for one of the school houses and also founded First Baptist Church of Murray. David Reed of Gilbertsville is his great great grandson, semi-retired District Court Judge and co-author of a book The Ancestors and Descendants of Henry Wildy Harding Sr. with his cousin. They have a family reunion this weekend and Reed speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good about Harding Sr.'s remarkable legacy.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

  Calloway County Public Library's Sandy Linn stops by Sounds Good to speak with Kate Lochte bout this week's Colonial Kids Day Programs sponsored by members of the Daughters of the American Revolution, the upcoming soulful acoustic pop Butch Rice concert, the summer of programming and some of her thoughts on Harper Lee's new novel Go Set A Watchman, the subject of the new WKMS Book Club.

Council on Postsecondary Education

The Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education will be hosting a Town Hall meeting in Murray tomorrow, welcoming public comment on the development of its 2016-2020 draft strategic agenda. Council President Dr. Bob King speaks with Kate on Sounds Good to share more about the meeting agenda and the proposed draft.