Kate Lochte

Station Manager

Kate Lochte was born in Texas, and grew up in Alabama, Alaska, New York, and Maine. She and Music City, Tennessee native Bob Lochte have sojourned in Los Angeles, Nashville, Knoxville, Chattanooga, Pulaski, and Greeneville, Tennessee and now, Murray, Kentucky. Kate has taught high school and college English; office-managed the Hunter Museum of Art in Chattanooga; written for the Chattanooga Free Press and the Pulaski Citizen newspapers; broadcast news and music for WMGL-FM and WKMS-FM; and broadcast for WETO-TV as the Kid's Klub's "Granny Goose." The Lochtes and their dogs enjoy being at home in the woods of Calloway County. For a time, Kate shared her appreciation for world music hosting shows Ports of Call and Country Music on WKMS.

Ways To Connect

Socially Present / Facebook

This fall, Kentucky entrepreneurs will learn how to prepare their ideas and present their work to a group of local investors.

Jonas Neihoff spoke to Kate Lochte by phone about how his marketing firm Socially Present came to partner with the Kentucky Innovation Network in Paducah and offer a workshop and pitch competiton for budding entrepreneurs.  

Kate Lochte

Slam poet Regie Cabico stopped by the WKMS studios to speak on his work and hosting the inaugural Mocktails Slam at Murray State University tonight. 

Cinema International

Murray State University's Cinema International kicks off this semester's lineup of films with Snowpiercer, an a science fiction film putting an alternative spin on the term "post-apocalyptic." The 2013 South Korean film depicts class warfare on a train of the sole survivors of the global ice age created by a failed attempt to stop global warming. On Sounds Good today, MSU Department of English and Philosophy faculty member Andrew Black previews the upcoming season of Cinema International, with a closer look at this week's film, Snowpiercer. 

Austin Peay State University Department of Art and Design Trahern Exhibition Schedule

Fifteen concrete figures of men, women and children augment a dark time in history through the powerfully crafted visual narrative of sculptor Stephen Hayes' Cash Crop, the first of this season's exhibits coming to Austin Peay University's Trahern Gallery.  Gallery Director Michael Dickens speaks with Kate on Sounds Good  about the lineup this season and the opening exhibit Cash Crop

Wickliffe Mounds State Historic Site / Facebook

Over 700 years ago, before the time of Daniel Boone and even Columbus, a community of ancient Native Americans thrived in a network of villages lining the Mississippi River. This weekend, children and adults alike can glimpse into that past at Wickliffe Mounds State Historic Site with a Mississippian Culture Gorget (pronounced 'gor-jet') Workshop. Park Manager Carla Hildebrand and Park Programmer Jessica Crisp speak with Kate on Sounds Good about the workshop and guided tour this Saturday.

Amazon.com

What do a mad scientist, a group of zany kids and monstrous frogs have in common? They're all in Murray State Alumnus Chris Schweizer's new graphic novel for kids, hitting brick-and-mortar and digital shelves this week. On Sounds Good, Chris talks about his experience as a graphic novelist and the inspiration behind his new book, The Creeps: Night of the Frankenfrogs

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Belly laughs and non-stop action are in store for audiences at the Playhouse in the Park production of "Noises Off" by Michael Frayn. The satirical farce about life in the theatre, which was once adapted into film featuring Carol Burnett, Michael Caine and many others, opens this weekend at the Murray community theatre. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with actress Vicki Morton about love triangles, underwear and sardines.

Facebook

Murray's nearly-three-month-old soup kitchen, Soup for the Soul, is preparing for a community-wide yard sale to raise funds for a new equipment. 

Co-founder Debbi Smith spoke to Kate Lochte on WKMS' Sounds Good to talk about how the kitchen has grown since opening and the goals they're still looking to accomplish.  

Murray State University 1961 Shield Yearbook, Courtesy of Wesley Bolin at Pogue Library

A group of six college students walked from Murray State University across the street to a small restaurant, about to quietly protest its “white-only” policy. Entering the establishment, the five white boys from New York ordered meals for the group. When the food was ready, Nancy Tyler Demartra, the first African American to attend MSU full-time and eventually graduate, stood up to pay. When the cashiers refused her money, the entire group said “no, thanks,” and walked out. It took about three months of visits like these, but with the help of others on campus the group finally pushed the restaurant to adopt an “open” serving policy. That was 1961. Fifty-four years later, Nancy speaks with Kate on Sounds Good about her experiences at MSU and her accomplishments in the Human and Civil Rights arenas.

MSU Master of Science in Sustainability / Facebook

While many Kentucky colleges offer undergraduate programs in sustainability, none have developed a sister program for graduate students. Dr. Howard Whiteman speaks with Kate on Sounds Good today on the development and implementation of Murray State's new Master of Science in Sustainability program, the first in the state. 

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