Joseph Lord

Joseph Lord is a Louisville native who was raised in Jeffersontown. He attended Western Kentucky University before covering public safety and later city government for The Anniston (Ala.) Star. He's also covered education for The Tribune and Evening News in southern Indiana and music and pop culture for Velocity, The Courier-Journal's weekly entertainment magazine. 

 
Most recently, Joseph has been a digital news reporter for The Courier-Journal.
 
Joseph, 32, and his wife, Brandy Warren, have two daughters and live in the St. Joseph neighborhood.

jlord@wfpl.org | Twitter

A federal judge intends to issue on final ruling on whether Kentucky must recognize out-of-state same-sex marriages within the next day.

The action could mean that same-sex couples married outside of Kentucky would be officially recognized by the state immediately, attorneys for the plaintiffs in the case—Bourke v. Beshear—said on Tuesday. But state Attorney General Jack Conway could appeal the case (he has 30 days) and then ask for a stay on recognizing out-of-state same-sex couples.

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet has created a new website meant to improve access to its data.

The DataMart includes state highway traffic counts, county-by-county spending numbers, road project information, traffic fatality data and more.

It can be accessed here.

Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear and Attorney General Jack Conway are asking a federal judge to deny summary judgment—and an immediate injunction—in a lawsuit challenging the state's same-sex marriage ban.

In December, Louisville residents Greg Bourke and Michael De Leon asked a federal judge to issue a ruling and implement an injunction against the state's ban on same-sex marriage. On Monday, Beshear and Conway asked the judge to deny Bourke and De Leon's request.

A child's future can be thwarted for years afte enduring several negative family events—a divorce, substance abuse in the home, an incarcerated parent, said Terry Brooks, executive director of Kentucky Youth Advocates, citing research.

And Kentucky has among the highest percentages of children who have had three or more of those adverse experiences in their homes, Brooks said.

He's speaking to data released this morning in the report Kids Count: The First Eight Years, from the Annie E. Casey Foundation and Kentucky Youth Advocates.

In the 2012-13 fiscal year, the number of people who contacted the Kentucky Human Rights Commission with possible discrimination incidents increased 30 percent compared to the same period a year before, according to an annual report.

Kentucky ranks last in the U.S. for access to subsidy programs that help low-income parents pay for child care costs while they work, according to a report from the National Women's Law Center.

The report released Wednesday compares how each state handles child care assistance programs, which is funded partially through a federal grant.

In most states, the condition of child care assistance programs improved from the previous year—meaning, for instance, more families may be eligible for the subsidy, the report said.

A low-key Kentuckian is among the nation's top landowners.

That's the word from The Land Report, a magazine for and about people who, well, own land.

The Land Report has recently ranked the "100 Largest Landowners in the U.S."—that is, the 100 people who own the most land in the nation.

No. 4 on the list is Brad Kelley. 

Critics of the state’s cuts to two programs benefiting thousands of Kentucky children are turning their focus to next year’s General Assembly session.

Earlier this year, the state Department for Community Based Services implemented drastic cuts to the Kinship Care and Child Care Assistance programs because of a budget shortfall. The programs give financial assistance to low-income working families to help cover child care costs.

Kentucky drivers will soon be assessed three "penalty points" against their licenses each time they're convicted of texting while driving.

The new penalty will be enacted through administrative regulations ordered by Gov. Steve Beshear, who announced the change in Louisville on Wednesday morning.

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