John Walker

News Reporter

John Walker is native of Jessamine County, Kentucky and a recent graduate of Murray State University's Journalism program. His roots are in far eastern Kentucky, but he was raised in Kentucky's famous Bluegrass region. Now he resides in far western Kentucky just as a way to experience all that is the Commonwealth. His initial plan was to pursue a newspaper career, but he quickly found a calling to radio. His interests include anthropology, folklore, politics and the environment. He loves to listen to Old Time and Mountain music as well as Traditional Celtic and Jazz. If you need to find him he is probably taking a nap in Murray State's quad or taking a stroll through the arboretum.

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Morning Cram
7:58 am
Fri November 15, 2013

The Morning Cram [watchmen edition]

From NPR: Nervous over a steep spike in armed robberies, several Oakland, Calif., neighborhoods have pooled funds to hire private security patrols. And while some residents feel safer, others worry that there is no one policing the private police force.

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Morning Cram
7:21 am
Thu November 14, 2013

The Morning Cram [just downstream edition]

From NPR: In the northern Rockies of Montana, wildlife is a part of daily conversation. Fishing alone generates $250 million a year, and the pursuit of trout brings in most of that money. But record droughts and declining snowpack mean streams are becoming less habitable for this revered fish.

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Morning Cram
8:10 am
Wed November 13, 2013

The Morning Cram [rent me edition]

From NPR: More and more people have started using the Internet to rent out their underused personal assets — apartments, cars, their spare time — to earn extra cash. The peer-to-peer economy is exploding, made possible by technology.

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Morning Cram
8:15 am
Tue November 12, 2013

The Morning Cram [rising tide edition]

From NPR: New ordinances adopted in the South Florida city require that new homes feature freshwater cisterns and be built higher than the current flood plain level. Three years ago, Key West joined other Florida cities planning for the impact of climate change. Says Key West's planning director, "We are in all senses of the word, vulnerable to sea level rise."

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Morning Cram
7:58 am
Mon November 11, 2013

The Morning Cram [not that kind of armory edition]

From NPR: One hundred years ago, the Armory Show in New York City gave many Americans their first look at what avant-garde artists in Europe were up to. The 1,400-work exhibition challenged ideas about artistic "progress" and shocked American audiences.

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Environment
11:40 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Fracking Wastewater Transport Gets Industry Support, Environmentalists Concerned

The U.S. Coast Guard’s proposed policy change to allow the transport of hydraulic fracturing wastewater on rivers has some environmental groups voicing opposition, citing safety concerns. The Kentucky Waterways Alliance says the wastewater might be too hazardous.

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Morning Cram
7:57 am
Fri November 8, 2013

The Morning Cram [the tallest towers edition]

From NPR: Is One World Trade Center now the tallest building in North America, or does that distinction belong to the Willis Tower in Chicago? The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, a non-profit organization that's based in Chicago, will make the final decision on Friday. One thing everyone can be sure of: There's only one.

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Morning Cram
7:56 am
Thu November 7, 2013

The Morning Cram [streetcars desired edition]

From NPR: In 2001, Portland, Ore., was the first to develop a new kind of streetcar system. Success there led to a resurgence, with at least two dozen cities planning, building or expanding trolley lines — places like Atlanta, St. Louis and Tucson, Ariz. But some wonder whether it's the best way to spend limited transit dollars.

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Environment
11:28 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Coast Guard Considers Changes In Hydraulic Fracturing Wastewater Transport On Rivers

Credit U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Digital Visual Library

The U.S. Coast Guard is considering a policy change to allow the transport of wastewater from hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, on inland waterways.

Oil and gas companies currently transport most of their wastewater by truck from the shale fields in Ohio and Pennsylvania to states with lighter regulations on storage, like Texas and Louisiana.

Now companies want to take the river route to save on fuel and personnel costs. But chemicals and other minerals in the wastewater could prove too risky to move by barge.

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Morning Cram
7:43 am
Wed November 6, 2013

The Morning Cram [global venue edition]

From NPR: Does a citizen of any country — not just the good ole U.S.A. — have an obligation to support its national teams? According to Frank Deford, in our world of global entertainment, passports don't matter and taste should trump nationalism.

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