Glynis Board

Ohio Valley ReSource Reporter at WVPB (Wheeling, WV)

Glynis Board drills deep for her ReSource stories on energy and the environment. She hails from the Northern Panhandle of West Virginia and is based in Wheeling. Glynis is a West Virginia University graduate who has honed her video and audio storytelling skills at West Virginia Public Broadcasting since 2004. Her work has won the Edward R. Murrow Award and “outstanding reporter” honors from the AP.

Jorfer, Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Appeals Court in Washington will hear arguments Tuesday in the case West Virginia versus the EPA, challenging the federal Clean Power Plan. That’s the centerpiece of the Obama Administration’s attempt to limit carbon emissions from power plants. 

Kenn W. Kiser, morgueFile.com

Coal-producing states are preparing for arguments next month in the federal appeals court case known as West Virginia v. EPA, challenging the Obama Administration’s Clean Power Plan to limit greenhouse gas emissions from power plants.

Helmut Seisenberger, 123rf Stock Photo

A study of drinking water systems found 6 million Americans, including people in West Virginia, Kentucky, and Ohio, are living with drinking water containing chemicals linked to a host of health problems.

Leonid Ikan, 123rf Stock Photo

Kentucky joined this week with a dozen other states to challenge the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s new rules on the oil and gas industry. 

Kara Lofton, West Virginia Public Radio

People in West Virginia are still recovering from floods that tore through communities like vengeful gods. When you look at the pictures and videos of the June flood – thick, brown, furious, unrelenting – it’s not hard to imagine how our ancestors believed supernatural beings were behind the devastation. Today, of course, we have better insight into the natural forces at work, and science shows us that the damage from nature’s wrath has a lot to do with human behavior.

iStockPhoto

One of the largest coal operators in the region is striking deals so that the terms of its bankruptcy can be finalized in court. One deal protects hundreds of workers while another sets aside millions for environmental cleanup.

Glynis Board

The energy that lights up, turns on, cools and heats our lives leaves a trail of waste. Natural gas is no exception. The waste from the gas drilling known as “fracking” is often radioactive. The gas industry produces thousands of tons of this “hot” waste and companies and state regulators throughout the Ohio River valley and Marcellus Shale gas region struggle to find safe ways to get rid of it.

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