Erica Peterson (KPR)

Kentucky Public Radio Correspondent

Erica Peterson is a reporter and Kentucky Public Radio correspondent based out of WFPL in Louisville, Kentucky.

Austin Ramsey, WKMS

Coal jobs in Kentucky declined sharply in the first quarter of this year, according to the state’s latest quarterly coal report.

Mitch McConnell/Facebook

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has a new legal argument that he says will scuttle the Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean Power Plan.

Robert Lynch, publicdomainpictures.net

A new whitepaper released by Kentucky regulators in draft form last week quantifies the economic effects of rising electricity prices on jobs in the state and around the country.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Wikimedia Commons

lawsuit that sought to have the federal government respond to requests for them to take over Kentucky’s water pollution program has been dismissed, but the plaintiffs plan to re-file the suit in the Court of Appeals.

Simmons College of Kentucky

Louisville’s Simmons College of Kentucky has been officially designated as a Historically Black College and University, or HBCU.

Wikimedia Commons/Author: Felix Andrews

Four federal agencies are teaming up to use satellite data in an attempt to better predict and prevent harmful algal blooms in lakes.

www.ohioriverfdn.org

The interstate commission that regulates pollution in the Ohio River is considering a formal change to the way certain pollutants are measured in the river.

WCN 24/7 / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

Kentucky’s Energy and Environment Cabinet will hold three meetings across the state to take public comments on oil and gas development.

Jack Corn / Environmental Protection Agency-National Archives

  Emma Burchett lives in Floyd County, in eastern Kentucky. She’s not a coal miner; she has never worked in or around a coal mine. But late last year, the 45-year-old Burchett was diagnosed with anthracosis, which is a mild form of black lung disease.

WFPL

Update 3:45 p.m.: Air Situation

Regulators detected hydrochloric acid gas in the smoke at the site. But they haven’t found any signs of the toxic gas downwind. The city’s air pollution monitors have registered slightly higher levels of particulate matter today than is typical, but there haven’t been any large spikes in air pollution since the fire began.

Pages