Erica Peterson (KPR)

Kentucky Public Radio Correspondent

Erica Peterson is a reporter and Kentucky Public Radio correspondent based out of WFPL in Louisville, Kentucky.

Gabe Bullard, via WFPL

There’s no dearth of research on health disparities in Appalachia. But a newly-formed group of researchers at Virginia Tech says there is a dearth of scientific research into why these disparities exist, and how environmental factors could be contributing.

Erica Peterson, WFPL

  New numbers from the first two quarters of this year show both coal production and employment are continuing to decline in Kentucky, despite President Donald Trump’s promises that miners would be going back to work.

John Paul Henry

  Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes says her office will not release state voter data to President Donald Trump’s election commission.

Trump, a Republican, formed the commission to investigate alleged voter fraud, which he has repeatedly claimed was widespread despite evidence to the contraryAs The Hill reported, the commission’s vice chairmen sent a letter Thursday requesting several pieces of information about voters.

By Judgefloro (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0

  Predicting the imminent arrival of an insect species that could devastate Kentucky’s sweet sorghum crops, the state Department of Agriculture has declared an emergency and is letting the commonwealth’s farmers apply a new pesticide to protect their plants. But the pesticide in question — Sivanto Prime — has come under fire from environmental groups who say it hasn’t been properly vetted and could pose a risk to bees and other animals.

Gabe Bullard, via WFPL

  A U.S. House committee has advanced a bill that would send a billion dollars for mine reclamation and economic development in coal communities.

iStockPhoto

After being name checked in two of President Donald Trump’s recent speeches, a new coal mine opened in Pennsylvania last week. But, while the new mine may be cause for local celebration and useful for political rhetoric, it isn’t a harbinger of what’s to come in Kentucky.

Erica Peterson | wfpl.org

The Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet has agreed to hold off on letting electric utilities transition to the state’s new, relaxed coal ash rules until litigation is complete, except under special circumstances.

Erica Peterson | wfpl.org

At several power plants around Kentucky, coal ash is mixed with water and stored in gigantic ponds. These ponds typically hold millions of gallons of sludge that contains dangerous contaminants like mercury, cadmium and arsenic. They sit in and around residential neighborhoods. And as WFPL’s Erica Peterson reports, many people living near the plants are still in the dark about what would happen in the event of an emergency.  

WKMS File Photo

A board that was ostensibly responsible for reviewing coal miners’ training and reviewing all proposed coal mine safety regulations will hold its last meeting next week.

Whitney Jones, WKMS

The University of Louisville’s Conn Center for Renewable Energy is planting more hemp this year at the school’s Belknap Campus.

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