Erica Peterson

Erica reports on environment and energy issues for WFPL, which run the gamut from stories about the regionââââ

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Kentucky is ranked near the top of a list no one wants to be on: the states with the highest number of people affected by health-based violations of federal drinking water laws.

kftc.org

The non-profit group Kentuckians for the Commonwealth has released a new set of recommendations for the state’s energy future. KFTC created the Empower Kentucky plan after more than two years of meetings with more than a thousand people around the state.

Vaclav Volrab/123rf Stock Photo

A report card issued by an advocacy group says solar jobs in Kentucky are still relatively few, but are growing.

Erica Peterson, WFPL

  A state Fish and Wildlife committee is recommending the full commission approve a plan to raise boat registration fees to combat the spread of invasive Asian carp in the commonwealth.

Asian carp are an invasive species, and they’ve been in the Mississippi and Ohio River basins for several years. They’re also in Kentucky and Barkley lakes in Western Kentucky. And once they make it into a body of water, they’re almost impossible to get out.

Alexey Stiop, 123rf Stock Photo

  When the legislature reconvenes next month, one of the bills lawmakers will be considering is a measure that could change Kentucky’s regulatory landscape. And experts say the changes could be particularly problematic for the state’s environmental regulations.

Erica Peterson | wfpl.org

  President-Elect Donald Trump has said he will revoke numerous federal regulations when he takes office, including the Obama administration’s rules to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from power plants. But while Trump’s Environmental Protection Agency may choose to turn a blind eye when it comes to enforcing the standard, getting rid of the Clean Power Plan entirely may be easier said than done.

Erica Peterson, WFPL News

For the past few years, politicians have gained votes in the coalfields by raising false hopes about a resurgence of coal.  

During his campaign, presidential candidate Donald Trump echoed the Republican line on coal: that it’s abundant, and unfairly targeted by environmental regulations under President Barack Obama’s administration.

J. Tyler Franklin/WFPL News

Several hundred people gathered at the federal courthouse in Louisville Tuesday to protest the Dakota Access Pipeline project; other similar rallies were held simultaneously in cities around the country.

Erica Peterson, WFPL News

Over the past year, President-elect Donald Trump has had a lot to say about energy.

As he campaigned around the country promising to “make America great again,” he also told people in Kentucky, West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Ohio that he would make coal great again, too. A Trump presidency, he promised, would oversee a resurgence of coal mining and burning.

Hannu Viitanen, 123rf Stock Photo

Louisville Gas and Electric and Kentucky Utilities are planning a new way to offer solar energy to residential customers. 

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