Dina Temple-Raston

Dina Temple-Raston is NPR's counter-terrorism correspondent and has been reporting from all over the world for the network's news magazines since 2007.

She recently completed a Nieman Fellowship at Harvard University where she studied the intersection of Big Data and intelligence.

Prior to NPR, Temple-Raston was a longtime foreign correspondent for Bloomberg News in Asia and served as Bloomberg's White House correspondent during the Clinton Administration. She has written four books, including The Jihad Next Door: Rough Justice in the Age of Terror, about the Lackawanna Six terrorism case. She is a frequent contributor to the PBS Newshour, a regular reviewer of national security books for the Washington Post Book World, and also contributes to the New Yorker, WNYC's Radiolab, the TLS, and the Columbia Journalism Review, among others.

She is a graduate of Northwestern University and Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism, and she has an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from Manhattanville College.

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President Obama has said this appears to be a terrorist attack, and NPR's counterterrorism correspondent Dina Temple-Raston is with us. She has been talking with investigators and law enforcement officials in the U.S. and France. Hi, Dina.

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And we're joined now by our national security editor Phil Ewing, who's here in the studio with us. Hi, Phil.

PHIL EWING, BYLINE: Hi, Ari.

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NPR has obtained what investigators believe could be the Dallas gunman's manifesto. It appeared underneath a photo of the man on social media. And for more on that, we turn to NPR's Dina Temple-Raston. Hi, Dina.

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