Chad Lampe

Interim Station Manager

Chad Lampe, a Poplar Bluff, Missouri native, was raised on radio. He credits his father, a broadcast engineer, for his technical knowledge, and his mother for the gift of gab. At ten years old he broke all bonds of the FCC and built his own one watt pirate radio station. His childhood afternoons were spent playing music and interviewing classmates for all his friends to hear. At fourteen he began working for the local radio stations, until he graduated high school. He earned an undergraduate degree in Psychology at Murray State, and a Masters Degree in Mass Communication. In November, 2011, Chad was named Assistant Station Manager. In October 2015, he was named Interim Station Manager upon the retirement of Kate Lochte.

Kentucky Associated Press Awards 2010

1st Place - Best Hard News - Ice Storm Overview

1st Place - Best Continuing Coverage - Ice Storm (staff)

Kentucky Associated Press Awards 2009

2nd Place - Best Public Affairs - TV Goes Digital

2nd Place - Best Special Series - Fueling the Purchase (staff)

Kentucky Associated Press Awards 2008

Second Place Best Hard News Feature

Honorable Mention Best Light News Feature

Honorable Mention Best Use of Sound

Kentucky Associated Press Awards 2007

Honorable Mention Best Public Service

Honorable Mention Best Hard News Feature

Second Place Best Use of Sound

Kentucky Public Radio Student Awards 2007

First Place Best Hard News Feature

Second Place Best Public Service

Ways to Connect

Murray State is losing its chief facilities officer as it embarks on three major construction projects.

Murray State University's 13th President Dr. Bob Davies visits the WKMS studios for the first of a series of monthly conversations on the state of the university. 

Chad Lampe

Angie Smith is in the middle, both literally and figuratively. She’s a single mom in the middle of raising two kids. She’s in the middle of updating and moving into a home built by her late grandfather. She’s in the middle of her life, at 42-years-old mostly marked with low income jobs starting at 18.

But that wasn’t her plan. Her childhood dream was to work aboard a ship for Greenpeace, protecting whales. She still wants to work in an environmental field.

Murray State University’s Board of Regents has endorsed the expansion of a dual enrollment program for high school students in and around Murray. The Thoroughbred Academy currently operates at MSU’s Hopkinsville regional campus. The academy offers courses to high school seniors to obtain both high school and college credit. The board’s move allows MSU officials to expand the program to MSU’s Murray campus.  The program boosts MSU’s enrollment and also allows high school graduates to enter college with a number of courses completed toward graduation.

KET Video Stream


  As Kentucky’s Republicans hope to take control of the state House of Representatives by electing a majority this fall, second district incumbent Richard Heath (R) is in a fight for his seat with  Jesse Wright (D).  At this weekend’s Fancy Farm Picnic Heath and Wright tangled over who would be a better advocate for their district which encompasses Graves County and southern McCracken.

Hopkinsville Mayor Dan Kemp, 68, is the newest member of the Murray State University Board of Regents. Governor Beshear’s office released Kemp’s name on Friday along with many other gubernatorial appointees. Kemp, a Democrat, replaces the term limited Marilyn Buchanon, also a Democrat.

John Paul Henry

Organizers expect a larger than usual crowd at this weekend's Fancy Farm Picnic in Graves County. The 134 year-old event has evolved from old-timey political stump speeches to a shout-fest as spectators try to overpower the speaker.

In 1975 the Fancy Farm Picnic was a little more refined. In fact, it was quiet enough to hear a flash bulb pop during then-Presidential Candidate George Wallace’s speech. Wallace survived an assassination attempt in 1972 that left him paralyzed below the waist.

Google Maps/Matt Markgraf


More downtown Murray buildings are likely to be demolished after this week’s massive downtown fire. City officials briefed community members this morning about the fire’s impact on the community.

Some businesses remain closed awaiting electrical and structural inspections before the city can re-energize offices with electricity and turn on natural gas supply lines. The fire’s cause is still unknown, and no one was injured.

Federal, state and local officials are praising the U.S. Department of Energy’s awarding a three-year $420 million clean-up contract to Fluor Federal Services, for decommissioning and decontamination of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant.

Monday marks the first day of work for new Murray State University president Bob Davies, who comes to MSU after five years in the same post at Eastern Oregon University.