Chad Lampe

News Director & Assistant Station Manager

Chad Lampe, a Poplar Bluff, Missouri native, was raised on radio. He credits his father, a broadcast engineer, for his technical knowledge, and his mother for the gift of gab. At ten years old he broke all bonds of the FCC and built his own one watt pirate radio station. His childhood afternoons were spent playing music and interviewing classmates for all his friends to hear. At fourteen he began working for the local radio stations, until he graduated high school. He earned an undergraduate degree in Psychology at Murray State, and a Masters Degree in Mass Communication. In November, 2011, Chad was named Assistant Station Manager.

Kentucky Associated Press Awards 2010

1st Place - Best Hard News - Ice Storm Overview

1st Place - Best Continuing Coverage - Ice Storm (staff)

Kentucky Associated Press Awards 2009

2nd Place - Best Public Affairs - TV Goes Digital

2nd Place - Best Special Series - Fueling the Purchase (staff)

Kentucky Associated Press Awards 2008

Second Place Best Hard News Feature

Honorable Mention Best Light News Feature

Honorable Mention Best Use of Sound

Kentucky Associated Press Awards 2007

Honorable Mention Best Public Service

Honorable Mention Best Hard News Feature

Second Place Best Use of Sound

Kentucky Public Radio Student Awards 2007

First Place Best Hard News Feature

Second Place Best Public Service

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Meet and Greet
12:08 pm
Thu October 4, 2012

MSU's New College of Education Dean on Planning for the Future

David Whaley
Murray State

Murray State’s new College of Education Dean, David Whaley, has more than 30 years of education experience and comes  to MSU from Iowa State University where he served as associate dean of teacher education. Whaley sits down with Chad Lampe to discuss the path to MSU, an upcoming legislative committee meeting at MSU and his goals for the college.

Front Page Episodes
12:15 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Front Page Sunday 9/30

Angela Hatton speaks with New Yeiser Art Center Director Josh White on Sounds Good

Facebook is a great way to get, and stay, in touch with friends and family, old or new.  It’s also a great way for anyone to access things you may only want a few people to see.  And on Front Page Sunday from WKMS News, we’ll look into ways you can get a better handle on what makes it onto the social media landscape. We’ll also get some perspective on the lawsuit filed by some national textbook publishers against a Murray businessman and speak with the new executive director of Paducah’s Yeiser Art Center.  Then, we find out how a ham sandwich centuries ago helped inspire a modern art form.

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Election 2012
10:31 am
Thu September 27, 2012

WKMS Features Candidate Forums on "Sounds Good"

2nd District State House: Richard Heath (R) & Kelly Whitaker (D)

WKMS News’ election coverage joins Sounds Good with Tracy Ross and Friends (11 A.M. to 1 weekdays) in October with weekly Friday candidate forums. Meet candidates seeking state offices for districts in our region without an incumbent in the race.  

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Restoration & Preservation
11:51 am
Mon September 17, 2012

2012 Kentucky Historic Preservation Conference Comes to Princeton This Week

The 2012 Kentucky Historic Preservation Conference begins this week in of Princeton.

The two-day conference will include sessions on selling historic properties, best practices for preserving endangered historic sites and converting schools and other public buildings into affordable housing.

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Front Page Episodes
11:41 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Front Page Sunday - September 16 Episode

The Black Patch Tobacco War in our part of the country was the most pronounced activity of military aggression between the civil war and the civil rights movement, we learn from Christian County Historian William T. Turner the key players in that conflict and how it’s remembered. 

Also, we’ll speak with futurist Ivan Potter on the lasting effects of this year’s drought, and Kentucky Supreme Court Justice Bill Cunningham’s take on the changing interoperations of the U.S. Constitution. Plus the history of Fulton’s Banana Festival and details about a Japanese performance group coming to MSU. 

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Tourism
9:30 am
Sun September 16, 2012

Fulton's Banana Festival 50 Years Later

It’s been 50 years since Fulton, Kentucky  hosted the first banana festival. This year festival organizers are preparing for what they hope will bring thousands of visitors, and boost morale in a town that's faced some economic hardships recently. Fulton's Ferry Morse Seed Company laid off than 100 employees earlier this year.  Festival organizer Christie Rogers speaks with Chad Lampe about the festival which runs from  Sept 22nd to Sept 29th. Learn more at the banana festival's website.

Front Page Episodes
10:20 am
Mon September 10, 2012

Front Page Sunday 9/9

Chip Hutcheson & Angela Hatton on Sounds Good

Marshall County elementary schools are changing how their students make the grade.  No more “F’s,” no more “A’s,” in fact, no more letter grades at all.  It’s part of a new system other Kentucky schools are using called “standards-based grading.”  We’ll hear more about it and why Marshall’s elemetaries are on board, on Front Page Sunday from WKMS News.

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Culture
4:02 pm
Thu September 6, 2012

Organizers Prepare for 25th Annual Pow-Wow in Hopkinsville

The 25th annual intertribal pow-wow is this weekend at the Trail of Tears Commemorative Park in Hopkinsville.  The park is located on a plot of land that served as a temporary home to Cherokee Indians for a short time in the 1830’s when they made their trek from their ancestral homes to Oklahoma. 

The  pow-wow began in 1987 features music, storytelling and native American dancing.  Chad Lampe speaks with Pow-Wow chairman Roger Richey about this year’s events.

Higher Education
10:57 am
Thu September 6, 2012

Budget Teams and Razing Ordway Hall: September Conversation with MSU President Dr. Randy Dunn

Multiple teams of Murray State faculty and staff are in looking into many aspects of the university’s budget to find ways to make the institution more efficient and grow revenue.  MSU President Dr. Randy Dunn digs into the details of the budget prioritization teams and what this work will mean for the future of the university.

Front Page Episodes
12:36 pm
Mon September 3, 2012

Front Page Sunday 9/2

A CEO of a large in employer in Murray is stepping aside and that leaves some uncertainty for hundreds of workers in our region. We also learn about decisions people over the age of 65 are making that impacts an area healthcare provider. Also, we’ll also get an overview of the ongoing debate over the benefits and risks of raw milk, and find out just how significant minor league baseball once was in our region.  Then, we resume our monthly conversations with Murray State President Dr. Randy Dunn and preview this week’s offering at Paducah’s Maiden Alley Cinema.

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