Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

The Golden Globe nominations were announced this morning. Among the nominees is Christopher Plummer for a role he played as a last-minute replacement for Kevin Spacey. NPR's Camila Domonoske reports.

Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the U.N., said on Sunday that women who have accused President Trump of sexual harassment and assault "should be heard."

More than a dozen women came forward during the 2016 campaign with allegations of unwanted touching or kissing or other forms of sexual harassment.

Haley addressed the allegations on CBS's Face the Nation, after discussing North Korea's missile tests and the plan to move the U.S. Embassy in Israel to Jerusalem.

The color of the year for 2018 is a vivid purple, according to Pantone, which gives the title to a new hue every December.

Specifically, "PANTONE 18-3838 Ultra Violet" is the chosen hue. ("Ultra violet" with a space, we'll note: actual "ultraviolet" light is, by definition, invisible.)

The Army, Navy, Marines and Air Force all regularly fail to submit required crime data to the FBI for inclusion in national databases, but the Air Force has shown improvement over the past several years, according to a new report released by the Department of Defense Office of the Inspector General.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Updated at 2:32 p.m. ET

Garrison Keillor, the creator and former host of A Prairie Home Companion, has been accused of inappropriate behavior with someone who worked with him, according to Minnesota Public Radio, which has announced it is cutting ties with Keillor and his production company.

Updated at 3 a.m. ET on Wednesday

North Korean state media say the country has launched a new type of intercontinental ballistic missile called the Hwasong-15. The statement says the missile is North Korea's most powerful ever and can reach all of the United States.

Earlier the Pentagon's initial assessment said the missile was an ICBM, the third tested by North Korea.

The controversial herbicide glyphosate will be permitted in the European Union for five more years, after Germany's agriculture minister changed his vote — a move that angered Germany's allies and threatened internal coalition-building, but satisfied European farmers who had worried about a threat to their business.

Glyphosate, known by trade name Roundup, is widely used in large-scale commercial farming, as NPR's Dan Charles explained in 2015.

A federal judge in Maryland has temporarily blocked all of President Trump's would-be ban on transgender Americans serving in the U.S. armed forces or receiving transition-related health care through the military.

The decision comes just weeks after another federal judge, based in Washington, D.C., blocked most of the policy change.

The Trump administration cannot withhold federal money to punish local governments for their noncompliance with immigration authorities, according to a ruling by a federal judge in California.

In an order announced Monday, Judge William Orrick permanently blocked the policy, issued as one of President Trump's earliest executive orders, ruling it was "unduly coercive" and violated the separation of powers.

Pages