Brian Naylor

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.

In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies, including transportation and homeland security.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many of the major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

The Department of Homeland Security issued a regulation Tuesday putting restrictions on the kinds of archaeological materials that can be imported from Egypt. That may not sound like a big deal unless maybe you're a collector or a museum. There are lots of federal regulations taking effect every day, and in fact there's been an uptick as the Obama administration's time in office wanes. Such an increase is troubling to Republicans, but gives hope to those who want new policies in place before...

Retired Gen. James Mattis' nomination to be President-elect Donald Trump's secretary of defense may, well, march through the Senate, but there is one potential obstacle to maneuver around: the retired general part. The National Security Act of 1947 , which established the current national defense structure, had a key stipulation, requiring that the secretary of defense be a civilian well removed from military service. In fact, the law is quite clear: "That a person who has within ten years...

President-elect Donald Trump delivered a campaign-style speech at what was billed as the first stop in a thank-you tour in Cincinnati, Ohio, tonight, in which he pledged to unite America while at the same time recounting old grievances against the news media, and his political opponents. Trump also used the occasion to announce he will nominate retired Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis as secretary of defense, calling him "the closest thing we have to Gen. George Patton of our time." Trump...

So here's a riddle: What college doesn't have a campus, or professors, or students or even a football team? Give up? The Electoral College! OK, that was a little juvenile (if you really want to bring back your childhood, here's a video explaining the Electoral College by Schoolhouse Rock.) But there are a lot of misconceptions about the Electoral College, according to Oliver Potts, director of the Office of the Federal Register. The college, he said, is not a place or entity or organization, ...

Reince Priebus once joked about his job as chairman of the Republican National Committee that people assumed he must be miserable. But Priebus said he didn't see it that way. "I'm not pouring Bailey's in my cereal," he told CNN. Now, as newly named chief of staff to President-elect Donald Trump, Priebus has his work cut out for him. Priebus will have a large say in hiring West Wing staff, and will "be in charge of day to day operations," he told Fox News on Monday morning. He'll also have the...

The election just ended and the new president doesn't even take office until Jan. 20. But the transition planning starts now. Who's going to be President-elect Donald Trump's secretary of state? His chief of staff? His education secretary? Now that the news of Trump's election has settled, speculation over how the president-elect will fill out his administration has consumed Washington. Keeping in mind the truism that nobody who knows is talking, and those who are talking don't really know,...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: Concerns are growing about the possible hacking of voting systems on Election Day. Forty-six states have asked the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to help make sure their systems are protected from disruptions next Tuesday, and some states are taking steps on their own. NPR's Brian Naylor reports. BRIAN NAYLOR, BYLINE: Ohio secretary of state Jon Husted says his state worked with all available public and...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Hacking has been a persistent issue during this campaign. Emails from a top Clinton aide have been posted on WikiLeaks and the federal government has raised concerns about the security of state voting systems. The federal government's own computer systems are vulnerable to hackers and one reason is that they are decades old. The person in charge of government IT is seeking some $3 billion to bring them up to date....

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: Control of congress comes down to a handful of Senate races this year, and one of those is North Carolina. Republican incumbent Richard Burr is facing a challenge that's tougher than expected. And one reason why it's so close - the candidates at the top of the ticket. NPR's Brian Naylor reports. BRIAN NAYLOR, BYLINE: At the very start of their only debate last Thursday night, Richard Burr and his Democratic...

The control tower at a major metropolitan airport can be a pretty chatty place. Some of the chatter comes from air traffic controllers literally and phonetically spelling out the routes pilots need to follow to their destinations, using the foxtrot-lima-sierra-tango alphabet. When a weather issue — say, a line of thunderstorms — pops up, routes have to be changed, often while the plane is already on the taxiway. So the controllers spell out new directions to the pilots, the pilots take them...

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