Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, and editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Updated at 8:55 p.m. ET.

He called it yapping, loose talk, and sloppiness. President Obama dismissed criticism of his administration's avoidance of the term "radical Islam" and urged America to live up to its founding values Tuesday, speaking at length about inclusiveness and religious freedom.

Gawker Media, the gossip and news company that lost a high-profile court case in which it was ordered to pay $140 million over a violation of Hulk Hogan's privacy, has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection from its creditors.

In addition to its eponymous website, Gawker operates several other popular sites, including Deadspin, Jezebel and Gizmodo. But reports out Friday also said Gawker's founder, Nick Denton, was trying to find a buyer for the company.

Update at 2:30 p.m. ET: Gawker Confirms Ziff Davis Deal

A hometown hero is being laid to rest in Louisville, Ky., as Muhammad Ali, the boxer and humanitarian, is buried Friday. Fans came to the city from far and wide to pay their respects as Ali's body passed by on its way to a private burial.

At his peak, he was incandescent, a light that glowed beyond the limitations of boxing and the era in which he was born. Muhammad Ali was an international superstar, loved for his humanity and wit. And now he's being mourned by everyone from former foes to the president.

Ali's daughter, Laila, posted an image of her father planting a proud kiss on his granddaughter Sydney.

"Thanks for all the love and well wishes," she wrote, in a post that has drawn nearly 300,000 responses on Facebook. "I feel your love and appreciate it!!"

Boxing great Muhammad Ali died late Friday at the age of 74, according to a statement from his family. He was being treated at a Phoenix area hospital for a respiratory issue. A memorial service is scheduled Saturday morning in Ali's hometown of Louisville, Ky., according to the Courier-Journal newspaper. Mayor Greg Fischer ordered flags lowered to half-staff to honor the sports legend.

Update at 3:15 p.m. ET June 4: Ali's Funeral Planned For June 10

Updated at 1:30 a.m. ET Thursday

Two bodies were found in a small office in an engineering building on the UCLA campus Wednesday. Los Angeles Police Department Chief Charlie Beck said the incident was a murder-suicide.

Beck said a gun was recovered at the scene, adding, "There is evidence that there could be a suicide note."

Saying "colleges have been treated as sanctuaries of learning where firearms have not been allowed," Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal vetoed a bill Tuesday that would have allowed licensed owners to carry guns on campus in all but a few buildings.

The "campus carry" legislation, HB 859, would have allowed guns on campuses and in buildings owned by any public college, technical school or other institution, providing exceptions only for areas used for athletic events, dormitories, and fraternity and sorority houses.

Freedom from corruption, at the lowest and highest levels of government, has often been cited as a spark for the Arab Spring uprisings in the Middle East. But according to a new report, many people — in one country, more than 90 percent — see corruption rising in the past year.

The Solar Impulse 2 landed in the Phoenix area Monday night, welcomed by spectators at Goodyear Airport as the plane's pilots continue their quest to be the world's first solar powered airplane to fly around the Earth.

The 745-mile trip took nearly 16 hours — less time than expected, largely due to powerful tailwinds. The plane reached a maximum altitude of 22,000 feet.

From member station KJZZ in Phoenix, Andrew Bernier tells our Newscast unit:

Updated at 11:20 a.m. ET

A U.S. Navy SEAL special operator was killed during an attack by ISIS fighters Tuesday in northern Iraq, Defense Department officials tell NPR's Tom Bowman.

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