Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, and editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Apollo Global Management says it's buying specialty grocery store chain Fresh Market Inc. for $1.36 billion in a deal that adds a premium of more than 20 percent to Fresh Market's closing stock price last week.

Based in Greensboro, N.C., the Fresh Market company was founded by Ray Berry; he and his son Brett together own nearly 10 percent of the company.

From a statement by Apollo Global Management:

A former Russian press minister and aide to President Vladimir Putin who was found dead in a Washington, D.C., hotel last November died from blunt force injuries, according to a report from the chief medical examiner's office.

It's the first time an official cause of death for Mikhail Lesin has been announced in the case. When Lesin died four months ago, Russian media outlets reported that the cause was a heart attack, citing family members.

One month after the Department of Justice sued the city of Ferguson, Mo., for changing the terms of a consent decree to overhaul Ferguson's police and legal system, the city's mayor says it's time to accept the original agreement.

Bernie Sanders pulled off an upset in Michigan on Tuesday, beating Hillary Clinton in an important state where he had trailed in recent polls. Clinton handily took Mississippi, with more than 80 percent of the vote. On the Republican side, Donald Trump racked up three more victories, and Ted Cruz won in Idaho.

The best play at this weekend's spring training game between the Pittsburgh Pirates and the Atlanta Braves didn't take place on the field — it was in the stands, where a man's fast reflexes saved a young fan from being hit in the face after a bat hurtled into the stands.

In an instant that's frozen in time, the barrel of the bat looms just inches away from the boy's nose and eyes, with the man's hand and forearm blocking its path.

While the dispute over cracking into an iPhone used by the San Bernardino shooter is at the center of a legal case between Apple and the FBI, the company recently told a federal court that it has received — and resisted — similar orders to help unlock iPhones and an iPad in recent months.

Harper Lee, the author of the classic novel To Kill a Mockingbird, has died in her hometown of Monroeville, Ala. The Pulitzer Prize-winning writer was 89.

Monroeville city officials confirmed reports of Lee's death to Alabama Public Radio. Her publisher, HarperCollins, also confirmed the news to NPR.

Her famous novel about a young girl's experience of racial tensions in a small Southern town has sold tens of millions of copies and been translated into dozens of languages.

A long line of mourners queued up to pay their respects to late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, whose body is now lying in repose at the Great Hall of the Supreme Court.

Parts of the observances will be open to the public. A private ceremony was slated to begin at 9:30 a.m. ET. Members of the public will be allowed into the hall until 8 p.m.

Shawna Cox, one of the last militants to be arrested for occupying an Oregon wildlife refuge last month, has filed a countersuit against the U.S. government and others in which she alleges "damages from the works of the devil in excess of 666,666,666,666.66."

While she invoked the number of the beast in her request for damages, Cox listed a wide array of people she plans to subpoena, including: ranchers in the western U.S.; judges and prosecutors; Oregon's current and former governor; local and state police officers; FBI agents; and "various law professors."

A natural gas leak that has poured methane gas into the air since October has been "temporarily controlled," according to a utility company in Southern California. Thousands of people have been forced to leave their homes in an upscale section of the San Fernando Valley.

"Many residents of the Porter Ranch community complained of headaches, nosebleeds and other symptoms," Danielle Karson tells our Newscast unit from Los Angeles. "State regulators need to inspect the broken pipe before cement is poured into the well to permanently seal it."

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