agriculture http://wkms.org en Wet Weather Could Have Harmful Effect on Tobacco As Farmers Operate on a Late Schedule http://wkms.org/post/wet-weather-could-have-harmful-effect-tobacco-farmers-operate-late-schedule <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">This spring’s wet weather may have a detrimental effect on the fall’s tobacco crop.</span></p><p>Calloway County Agriculture Extension Agent Matt Chadwick says most farmers set their plants before Memorial Day, but this year many are on a late schedule. He also says the tobacco that has been set has suffered some damage from recent storms.</p><p> Thu, 12 Jun 2014 15:47:42 +0000 Whitney Jones 41246 at http://wkms.org Wet Weather Could Have Harmful Effect on Tobacco As Farmers Operate on a Late Schedule Delay in Produce for Farmer's Markets http://wkms.org/post/delay-produce-farmers-markets <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Farmer’s markets may see a delay in produce this season due to an extraordinarily cold winter. Meredith Hall, Agriculture Agent for </span>Crittenden<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> County, says planting is two weeks behind schedule and cold weather crops like lettuce, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts, may be late to market.&nbsp;</span></p><p> Sun, 18 May 2014 13:00:00 +0000 Allison Crawford 40617 at http://wkms.org Delay in Produce for Farmer's Markets Farm Bill Uncertainty Could Affect Food/Dairy Prices http://wkms.org/post/farm-bill-uncertainty-could-affect-fooddairy-prices <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">With the U.S. government reopened and a budget crisis averted for now, Congress has shifted it's attention towards the Farm Bill.&nbsp;</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">The multi-year legislation governs agriculture programs and ranges from regulating food prices and rural development to conservation and nutrition assistance. The bill has caused contention among members over spending cuts, and the past shutdown has only slowed discussion.&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Kentucky Farm Bureau Director of National Affairs Joe Cain said if Congress doesn’t reauthorize crop insurance provisions by the&nbsp;January </span>1<sup>st</sup><span style="line-height: 1.5;"> deadline, it would cause uncertainty for farming lenders and could result in a rise in food prices.</span></p><p> Mon, 21 Oct 2013 17:45:52 +0000 Rob Canning 35901 at http://wkms.org Farm Bill Uncertainty Could Affect Food/Dairy Prices MSU Hutson School of Agriculture Dean on Technology, Education, and More http://wkms.org/post/msu-hutson-school-agriculture-dean-technology-education-and-more <p>Murray State’s Hutson School of Agriculture Dean Tony Brannon joins Kate Lochte on Sounds Good.&nbsp;<span style="line-height: 1.5;">They take a look at agriculture in the region and across the state, how technology has changed the course of agriculture and education, and work at the Breathitt&nbsp;Veterinary Center. <a href="http://www.murraystate.edu/agr.aspx">See more about the Hutson School of Agriculture</a>.</span></p><p> Thu, 25 Jul 2013 21:39:32 +0000 Kate Lochte 33420 at http://wkms.org MSU Hutson School of Agriculture Dean on Technology, Education, and More Ky. Farmers Looking at Prospect of High Yields http://wkms.org/post/ky-farmers-looking-prospect-high-yields <p>A new agriculture forecast says plenty of rain and cooler temperatures mean Kentucky grain farmers could see productive yields later this year.</p><p>The Kentucky office of the National Agricultural Statistics Service says 85 percent of the commonwealth's corn crop and 84 percent of its soybean crop are rated good or excellent.</p><p> Fri, 19 Jul 2013 21:26:53 +0000 John Null & The Associated Press 33243 at http://wkms.org Ky. Farmers Looking at Prospect of High Yields Sorghum Making Comeback to Rivers Region http://wkms.org/post/sorghum-making-comeback-rivers-region-0 <p><a href="http://mediad.publicbroadcasting.net/p/wkms/files/201302/2-6-Finished-Sorghum-Feature.mp3" style="font: 15px/22px Georgia, Times, serif; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; color: rgb(12, 76, 162); text-transform: none; text-indent: 0px; letter-spacing: normal; word-spacing: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: normal; orphans: 2; widows: 2; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;"><u>Click here to download the Mp3</u></a><span style="font: 15px/22px Georgia, Times, serif; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); text-transform: none; text-indent: 0px; letter-spacing: normal; word-spacing: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important; white-space: normal; orphans: 2; widows: 2; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;">.</span></p><p style="font: 15px/22px Georgia, Times, serif; margin: 0px 0px 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); text-transform: none; text-indent: 0px; letter-spacing: normal; word-spacing: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: normal; orphans: 2; widows: 2; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;">When most people think of sorghum they think of sorghum molasses, a contemporary of modern day maple syrup. But recent breakthroughs are changing sorghum’s role as a pancake sweetener.</p><p style="font: 15px/22px Georgia, Times, serif; margin: 0px 0px 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); text-transform: none; text-indent: 0px; letter-spacing: normal; word-spacing: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: normal; orphans: 2; widows: 2; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;">Calloway County Farmer Trip Furches leans forward in his office chair as he explains why last year was the first time he planted energy sorghum and sweet sorghum.</p><p> Fri, 08 Feb 2013 22:00:19 +0000 John Walker 27852 at http://wkms.org Sorghum Making Comeback to Rivers Region Farmers Use Radishes to Enrich Soil http://wkms.org/post/farmers-use-radishes-enrich-soil <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Many of farmer Jim Kelly’s fields in Murray are bright green with winter wheat even after several frosts. But tromp around some of his other crop fields and you’ll find the withering leaves of radishes. And he’s just going to keep letting them rot.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">"</span><em style="line-height: 1.5;">These things are in the process of dying. See, some of them already have," he said.</em></p><p>Kelly’s crop usually consists of tobacco, wheat, soybeans, corn and hay. But this year he’s adding radishes to his rotation in his soybean fields as a cover crop. The pale yellow vegetable looks a lot like a carrot and digs down breaking up the soil. Kelly won’t harvest the radishes. They grow until the first hard freeze then begin to die.</p><p> Sat, 19 Jan 2013 17:30:00 +0000 Whitney Jones 26975 at http://wkms.org Farmers Use Radishes to Enrich Soil Despite Drought, Ky. Agriculture Revenues Could Set Records http://wkms.org/post/despite-drought-ky-agriculture-revenues-could-set-records <p>Despite experiencing one of the worse droughts in U.S. history, agriculture economists in Kentucky are projecting record cash receipts for the state’s farmers.</p><p>During their annual outlook during the Kentucky Farm Bureau conference, economists from the University of Kentucky say they think Kentucky will break the $5-billion barrier in revenues this year. Thu, 06 Dec 2012 17:44:22 +0000 Kenny Colston (KPR) 25375 at http://wkms.org Despite Drought, Ky. Agriculture Revenues Could Set Records Kentucky Agriculture Fares Better Than Predictions http://wkms.org/post/kentucky-agriculture-fares-better-predictions <p>Kentucky’s agriculture industry is faring better than early predictions.&nbsp; The agriculture industry, which includes crops, cattle and horses, earned more than $5 billion.&nbsp; That figure is beyond Kentucky’s reach this year, but University of Kentucky Agriculture Economist Will Snell says many farmers should still do okay.</p><p> Wed, 31 Oct 2012 20:17:31 +0000 Stu Johnson (KPR) 23939 at http://wkms.org Kentucky Agriculture Fares Better Than Predictions US Ag Secretary Visits Tennessee http://wkms.org/post/us-ag-secretary-visits-tennessee <p>U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack makes a Tennessee visit today to discuss the importance of passing comprehensive food, farm and jobs legislation. He will also talk about revitalizing small rural businesses and communities. Vilsack's stops include Cedar Hill and Clarksville. Officials say Tennessee farm income rose from $447 million in 2010 to almost $800 dollars in 2011.</p> Fri, 19 Oct 2012 12:04:28 +0000 Whitney Jones & The Associated Press 23438 at http://wkms.org US Ag Secretary Visits Tennessee