Louise Jones http://wkms.org en Watson & Robinson Collection Offers Glimpse into African-American History in Hopkinsville http://wkms.org/post/watson-robinson-collection-offers-glimpse-african-american-history-hopkinsville <p>Kate Lochte speaks with Louise Jones of the Kentucky Historical Society about the Watson &amp; Robinson Families Collection on exhibit at the Hopkinsville-Christian County Public Library. The collection features 27 handwritten letters detailing family history information and offers a glimpse into the history of African-American communities in Hopkinsville. A free community event, made possible by the Kentucky Historical Society and the African American Genealogy Group of Kentucky, will be held July 20 at the library. Sessions include open-sharing sessions about the letters, and a special panel discussion on researching African-American roots. For more information, contact the KHS Reference Desk at 502-564-1792, extension 4460, or email <a href="mailto:KHSrefdesk@ky.gov">KHSrefdesk@ky.gov</a>.</p><p> Tue, 09 Jul 2013 16:42:21 +0000 Kate Lochte 32900 at http://wkms.org Watson & Robinson Collection Offers Glimpse into African-American History in Hopkinsville Family Letters Tell of Christian County's Enslaved and Free People http://wkms.org/post/family-letters-tell-christian-countys-enslaved-and-free-people <p>When was the last time you hand wrote a letter? For most people, not recently. In the 19<sup>th</sup> century, letters were vital links to family and friends. And for historians today, they are a snapshot of daily life. The Kentucky Historical Society recently added 27 letters to its collection. Called the Watson and Robinson letters, they contain information about the lives of free and enslaved families in Hopkinsville and Lexington. Louise Jones is the director of Special Collections and the Martin F. Schmidt Research Library. Jones spoke with Angela Hatton about the significance of the Watson and Robinson collection. Sun, 05 Aug 2012 14:00:00 +0000 Angela Hatton 20072 at http://wkms.org Family Letters Tell of Christian County's Enslaved and Free People