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Uncooperative Witnesses Delay Kentucky Sexual Harassment Inquiry

Some state workers are refusing to cooperate with an investigation of a secret sexual harassment settlement involving four Republican lawmakers.

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Updated at 12:13 p.m. ET

Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe has resigned from office, according to the speaker of the country's parliament. Midway through proceedings to impeach the president Tuesday, Speaker Jacob Mudenda read what he said was Mugabe's letter of resignation as the body of lawmakers erupted in jubilant applause.

The Trump administration cannot withhold federal money to punish local governments for their noncompliance with immigration authorities, according to a ruling by a federal judge in California.

In an order announced Monday, Judge William Orrick permanently blocked the policy, issued as one of President Trump's earliest executive orders, ruling it was "unduly coercive" and violated the separation of powers.

Federal regulators are on track to loosen regulations of cable and telecom companies.

The Federal Communications Commission will vote Dec. 14 on a plan to undo the landmark 2015 rules that had placed Internet service providers like Comcast and Verizon under the strictest-ever regulatory oversight.

The vote is expected to repeal so-called net neutrality rules, which prevent broadband companies from slowing down or blocking any sites or apps, or otherwise deciding what content gets to users faster.

Nicole Erwin | Ohio Valley ReSource

Napoleon famously said that an army marches on its stomach; troops must be fed in order to fight. But what happens when that army faces hunger after marching back home?  

Federal statistics show tens of thousands of U.S. military veterans struggle with homelessness, hunger and food insecurity. As the holiday season approaches, a pilot program in the Ohio Valley aims to serve those who served their country.

It's only 9 a.m. on the Friday before Thanksgiving, but there's already a line at Magee's Bakery in Lexington, Ky., filled with people holding dense, sugary pies they've pulled from the bakery shelves.

Greg Higgins, the president and head baker at Magee's, says a rush for Kentucky transparent pies is pretty typical at this time of year.

"This is a standard thing for us to do because of the number of people who are from Maysville — because that's where the transparent name comes from, in that region," Higgins says.

Most Americans don't want their family members to pass along their political opinions while passing the turkey and dressing this Thanksgiving.

According to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll, 58 percent of people celebrating the holiday are dreading having to talk politics around the dinner table. Just 31 percent said they were eager to discuss the latest news with their family and friends, while 11 percent are unsure.

Photo via alz.org

Kentucky is reportedly the first state in the country to offer a specialty license plate drawing attention to Alzheimer’s disease.

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Representatives of four different groups are calling for more attention to the number of women incarcerated in Kentucky. The groups claim much of that imprisonment stems from low level non-violent drug crimes.

Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET Tuesday

Veteran television host Charlie Rose has been fired by CBS, a day after eight women told The Washington Post that he sexually harassed them between the late 1990s and 2011.

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A phone scammer is targeting senior citizens in McCracken County pretending to be affiliated with the local sheriff’s department. 

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Nicole Erwin

Gutting Guest Worker Rights: Migrant Labor Bill Cuts Protections

Last year, more than a thousand Ohio Valley farmers used a complicated federal visa program to hire some 8,000 foreign workers for seasonal jobs. Farmers say the visa program is too bureaucratic, and a bill before Congress promises to cut red tape. But labor advocates say the bill would strip guest workers of many protections in an industry where wage theft is already a problem.

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